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March 25, 2015 Day 65of the Seventh Year - History

March 25, 2015 Day 65of the Seventh Year - History



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March 25, 2015 Day 65 of the Seventh Year

President Barack Obama jokes with Anne Ha of Philadelphia, Pa., and other guests backstage prior to an event marking the fifth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and kick-off of the Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building South Court Auditorium, March 25, 2015. Ha, who signed up for health insurance though the Affordable Care Act and was later diagnosed with cancer, attributes the insurance with saving her life.


10:30AM THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks marking the fifth anniversary of the Affordable Care Act
South Court Auditorium
Open Press (Pre-Set 9:00AM; Final Gather 10:00AM – Stakeout Location)

11:00AM THE PRESIDENT receives the Presidential Daily Briefing
Oval Office
Closed Press

3:20PM THE PRESIDENT meets with Secretary of Health and Human Services Burwell
Oval Office
Closed Press

4:45PM THE PRESIDENT meets with local elected officials and small business exporters
Roosevelt Room


International Four Days Marches Nijmegen

The International Four Day Marches Nijmegen (Dutch: Internationale Vierdaagse Afstandsmarsen Nijmegen) is the largest multiple day marching event in the world. It is organised every year in Nijmegen, Netherlands in mid-July as a means of promoting sport and exercise. Participants walk 30, 40 or 50 kilometres daily depending on their age and gender and, on completion, receive a royally approved medal (Vierdaagsekruis). The participants are mostly civilians, but there are also a few thousand military participants.

  • 40 km × 4 days – Wearing uniform + at least 10 kg (+ water, etc.) marching weight for males aged 18–49, for females the weight is optional.

March 25, 2015 Day 65of the Seventh Year - History

For over 400 years, more than 15 million men, women and children were the victims of the tragic transatlantic slave trade, one of the darkest chapters in human history.

Every year on 25 March, the International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade offers the opportunity to honour and remember those who suffered and died at the hands of the brutal slavery system. The International Day also aims to raise awareness about the dangers of racism and prejudice today.

In order to more permanently honour the victims, a memorial has been erected at United Nations Headquarters in New York. The unveiling took place on 25 March 2015. The winning design for the memorial, The Ark of Return by Rodney Leon, an American architect of Haitian descent, was selected through an international competition and announced in September 2013.

The Ark of Return, the Permanent Memorial to Honour the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, located at the Visitors' Plaza of UN Headquarters in New York. UN Photo/Rick Bajornas

For more information

Follow us on Twitter @rememberslavery and join us on Facebook.
Contact: Remember Slavery Programme, Education Outreach Section,
Outreach Division, Department of Global Communications


14 April 1986

General Dynamics F-111F Aardvark with 2000 pound GBU-10 Paveway II laser-guided bombs at RAF Lakenheath, 14 April 1981. (U.S. Air Force)

14 April 1986: In response to several acts of international terrorism sponsored by the Libyan regime of Muammar Khadafi, the United States launched Operation El Dorado Canyon. Along with A-6E Intruders, F/A-18 Hornets and A-7 Corsair IIs from the aircraft carriers USS America and USS Coral Sea, 24 General Dynamics F-111F Aardvarks of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing from RAF Lakenheath, accompanied by EF-111 Ravens for electronic counter measures, and flew 3,500 miles to their targets.

Navy aircraft attacked Benina Airfield and the Benghazi barracks, while the Air force fighter bombers, using GBU-10 Paveway II 2,000-pound laser-guided bombs, attacked the Aziziyah Barracks and the Sadi Bilal terrorist training camp at Tripoli. Because of the length of the flight, the F-111s had to refuel from KC-10 Extender air tankers four times in each direction. The KC-10s, in turn, refueled in flight from KC-135 Stratotankers.

There were very stringent rules of engagement in place, and for that reason, the majority of the Aardvarks did not release their bombs.

Libya had some of the most sophisticated air defenses in the world. Analysis indicated that only three cities in Russia were more heavily defended. Even so, of the 55 aircraft in the two attack forces, only one F-111 was lost, probably shot down by a surface-to-air missile. Its two man crew were killed.

A number of Libyan aircraft and facilities were destroyed. 37 people were killed and 93 wounded. From the standpoint of destruction caused, the results were minimal. But the effects on Colonel Khadafi were pronounced, and resulted in a significant scaling back of his regime’s terrorist activities. Viewed from that perspective, the mission was a complete success.

General Dynamics F-111F 70-2380, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, with wings swept for high-speed flight, over a desert landscape. (U.S. Air Force)


Iris Greybull, age 65, of Poplar

Iris Ann Greybull “Wik muk hey Wakan O la Wan” Rainbow Medicine Song Woman, was born March 18, 1950 to Mary Red feather and Arthur Greybull, Sr. in Poplar, Montana.

Wik muk hey Wakan O la Wan, began her last ceremony to cross over to her homeland on March 24, 2015 at her home in Poplar.

Iris had attended schools in both Poplar and Lodge Pole, Montana. She graduated from Poplar in 1968. She then furthered her education thus becoming a dental assistant.

She met Robert Daniels, they then married and from this union came two children, Shari Lynn and Robert (Cindy) Alvin Daniels. They later divorced yet remained friends.

The path she began, the Red Road led her to enriching not only her own life, but the lives of others, emotionally, spiritually and physically. She continually supported all those who chose to walk this way of life. Making numerous lifelong friends in her journey’s (known to as “Tumbleweed”).

Iris was firm, strong willed, knowledgeable, yet compassionate and sympathetic toward anyone who she met on this sacred path. Always giving and sharing be it spiritually or emotionally intuitively knowing the needs of those she encountered. Always reminding those to take their own power and walk with it. Her connection with music and the Creator led her to be a very powerful singer that touched many hearts and spirits.

She was a fire starter in anything that touched her heart. Helping with volunteer work that she felt would benefit all, not only her own, but all people. Always helping prpare and going to sweat to pray for everyone and everything. She enjoyed spending that time with her sweat hog friends.

Iris had a fierce love for her grandchildren, Calvin, Cayana (Shari), Honey and Caden (Bob & Cindy), spending many precious moments at Pow-Wows, Round Dances and family events, acquiring as much leftovers as possible, fully prepared with her own personal wa tetcha bag.

In her last days she enjoyed listening to music, eating what she wanted (bacon), spending time with friends and loved ones and eating some more.

She is survived by her children Shari, Bob (Cindy) Daniels brother Arthur Greybull niece and nephew Arthur and Ashley many extended relatives in North and South Dakota and Montana. She also had her Sundance sisters whom she held near and dear to her heart and honored Saddie Mann, Caroline Cuny, Connie (Fox) Twins, Yvette Young Bear, Beckki Night, Raqiba Rybicki Luchau and Nona Longknife.

She was preceded in death by her parents, Alan, Gary, Neal Drum, Ethel Iron Road, Bill and Verna Greybull and Gladys Two Horses.


Nearly half a million Americans suffered from Clostridium difficile infections in a single year

This website is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated.

Press Release

Embargoed until: Wednesday, February 25, 2015, 5:00 pm ET
Contact: Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile)

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) caused almost half a million infections among patients in the United States in a single year, according to a study released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Approximately 29,000 patients died within 30 days of the initial diagnosis of C. difficile. Of those, about 15,000 deaths were estimated to be directly attributable to C. difficile infections, making C. difficile a very important cause of infectious disease death in the United States. More than 80 percent of the deaths associated with C. difficile occurred among Americans aged 65 years or older. C. difficile causes an inflammation of the colon and deadly diarrhea.

Previous studies indicate that C. difficile has become the most common microbial cause of healthcare-associated infections in U.S. hospitals and costs up to $4.8 billion each year in excess health care costs for acute care facilities alone. The new study found that 1 out of every 5 patients with a healthcare-associated C. difficile infection experienced a recurrence of the infection and 1 out of every 11 patients aged 65 or older with a healthcare-associated C. difficile infection died within 30 days of diagnosis.

&ldquoC. difficile infections cause immense suffering and death for thousands of Americans each year,&rdquo said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. &ldquoThese infections can be prevented by improving antibiotic prescribing and by improving infection control in the health care system. CDC hopes to ramp up prevention of this deadly infection by supporting State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs in all 50 states.&rdquo

Patients at Highest Risk

Patients who take antibiotics are most at risk for developing C. difficile infections. More than half of all hospitalized patients will get an antibiotic at some point during their hospital stay, but studies have shown that 30 percent to 50 percent of antibiotics prescribed in hospitals are unnecessary or incorrect. When a person takes broad-spectrum antibiotics, beneficial bacteria that are normally present in the human gut and protect against infection can be suppressed for several weeks to months. During this time, patients can get sick from C. difficile picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread person to person. Unnecessary antibiotic use and poor infection control may increase the spread of C. difficile within a facility and from facility to facility when infected patients transfer, such as from a hospital to a nursing home.

Older Americans are especially vulnerable to this deadly diarrheal infection. The CDC study released today found that 1 out of every 3 C. difficile infections occurs in patients 65 years or older and 2 out of every 3 healthcare-associated C. difficile infections occur in patients 65 years or older. More than 100,000 C. difficile infections develop among residents of U.S. nursing homes each year. Women and Caucasian people are at increased risk of C. difficile infection.

Approximately two-thirds of the C. difficile infections were found to be associated with an inpatient stay in a health care facility, but only 24 percent of the total cases occurred among patients while they were hospitalized. Almost as many cases occurred in nursing homes as in hospitals, and the remainder of the healthcare-associated cases occurred among patients who were recently discharged from a health care facility.

Improving Antibiotic Use Critical for Preventing C. difficile

Although more than 150,000 of the half a million infections in the new study were community-associated and thus had no documented inpatient health care exposure, a separate recent CDC study found that 82 percent of patients with community-associated C. difficile infections reported exposure to outpatient health care settings such as doctor&rsquos or dentist&rsquos offices in the 12 weeks before their diagnosis this finding underscores the need for improved antibiotic use and infection control in these settings as well. It is estimated that more than 50 percent of antibiotics are prescribed unnecessarily in outpatient settings for upper respiratory infections like cough and cold illness, most of which are caused by viruses.

Another recent CDC study showed that a 30 percent decrease in the use of antibiotics linked to C. difficile infections in hospitals could reduce the deadly infections by more than 25 percent in hospitalized and recently discharged patients. A new retrospective study from a Canadian hospital found that a 10 percent decrease in overall antibiotic use across different wards was associated with a 34 percent decrease in C. difficile infections. A third CDC study among patients without a recent hospitalization or nursing home stay (i.e., community-associated cases) found that a 10 percent reduction in the use of all antibiotics in outpatient settings could reduce C. difficile infections by 16 percent. In England in recent years, the number of C. difficile infections has been reduced by well over 60 percent, largely due to improvements in antibiotic prescribing.

To help hospitals develop antibiotic prescribing improvement programs (also called &ldquoantibiotic stewardship&rdquo programs), CDC has developed several tools, including a list of Core Elements of Hospital Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and an accompanying checklist. CDC is also working with states to improve outpatient prescribing and implement stewardship across the continuum of care and has provided a variety of resources through the Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work and Get Smart for Healthcare campaigns.

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has developed a toolkit to help hospitals implement antibiotic stewardship programs to reduce C. difficile infections. This toolkit was created as part of AHRQ&rsquos Healthcare-Associated Infections Program, which conducts research and implementation projects to prevent HAIs. Preventing all forms of HAIs contributes to reducing C. difficile infections by reducing the need for antibiotic use.

&ldquoAHRQ&rsquos HAI Program funds projects that generate new scientific knowledge and, like the work on C. difficile, make this knowledge practical and approachable so clinicians on the front lines of care can prevent infections and make care safer for their patients,&rdquo said AHRQ Director Richard Kronick, Ph.D.

Preventing C. difficile Is a National Priority

Based on the National Action Plan to Prevent Health Care-Associated Infections: Road Map to Elimination, new 2020 national reduction targets are being established for C. difficile, and all hospitals participating in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services&rsquo (CMS) Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting Program have been reporting C. difficile infection data to CDC&rsquos National Healthcare Safety Network since 2013. Those baseline data will allow continued surveillance for C. difficile infections to monitor progress in prevention.

&ldquoCMS invests in structured learning and improvement opportunities for hospitals and communities through Quality Improvement Organizations,&rdquo said CMS Acting Principal Deputy Director Patrick Conway, M.D. &ldquoThe Quality Innovation Networks systematically support clinicians in the sharing of best practices in antibiotic stewardship and prevention of C. difficile.&rdquo

The State Antibiotic Resistance Prevention Programs that would be supported by the funding proposed in CDC&rsquos FY 16 budget would work with health care facilities in all 50 states to detect and prevent both C. difficile infections and antibiotic-resistant organisms. The FY 16 budget would also accelerate efforts to improve antibiotic stewardship in inpatient and outpatient settings. During the next five years, CDC&rsquos efforts to combat C. difficile infections and antibiotic resistance under the National Strategy to Combat Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria will enhance national capabilities for antibiotic stewardship, outbreak surveillance, and antibiotic resistance prevention. These efforts hold the potential to cut the incidence of C. difficile infections in half.


On March 8, Luke John Emslander, 41, of St. Cloud, was arrested in Stearns County on a Wright County warrant for check forgery violations.

On March 8, Carl Thomas Seehof, 60, of Delano, was arrested in Delano on the charge of driving after cancellation inimical to public safety.

On March 9, Tyler Austin Norton, 19, of Monticello, was arrested in Annandale on the charge of 3rd degree burglary.

On March 9, Ja'Vaughn Elijah-Marquise Tieh, 23, of Mounds View, was arrested in Anoka County on Wright County, Itasca County, Scott County, Stearns County and Washington County warrants for theft and a Dakota County warrant for identity theft.

On March 9, Johnathan Michael Rausch, 38, of Clearwater, was arrested in Sherburne County on a Wright County warrant for domestic assault violations.

On March 9, Taylor Chase Lazarre, 23, of Waite Park, was arrested in Cokato Township on the charges of 2nd degree burglary and trespassing.

On March 9, Becky Lee Miller, 65, of Orange, CA, was arrested in Delano on the charge of 2nd degree DWI.

On March 9, Rodney Lee Wojcik, 44, of Zimmerman, was arrested in Monticello on a Mille Lacs County warrant for domestic assault.

On March 10, Starlene Marie Smith, 40, of Sioux Falls, SD, was arrested in Hennepin County on a Wright County warrant for theft and a Swift County warrant for 5th degree possession of a controlled substance.

On March 10, Trenell Earl Rogers, 33, of Waverly, was arrested in Buffalo on a MN Department of Corrections warrant for a parole violation.

On March 10, Daniel Jerome Dols, 25, of Clearwater, was arrested in Clearwater on a MN Department of Corrections apprehension and detention order for a parole violation.

On March 11, Drew Michael Marcus, 31, of Otsego, was arrested in Albertville on the charge of 3rd degree DWI and a Wright County warrant for harassing phone call violations.

On March 11, Chris David Giles-Ambriz, 23, of Long Prairie, was arrested in Douglas County on a Wright County warrant for 1st degree criminal sexual conduct violations.

On March 11, Remah Clara Abbas Harb, 29, of Crystal, was arrested in Hennepin County on a Wright County warrant for 5th degree possession of a controlled substance violation.

On March 11, Joseph Lee Williams, 46, of Coon Rapids, was arrested in Monticello on the charge of violation of a domestic abuse no contact order, Wright County warrants for 5th degree possession of a controlled substance and interference with a 911 call and an Anoka County warrant for 5th degree possession of a controlled substance.

On March 12, Michael Todd Lundgren, 45, of Waverly, was arrested in Waverly on Wright County warrants for violation of a domestic abuse no contact order, 5th degree possession of a controlled substance and possession of pornographic work violations.

On March 12, Alexander Daniel Bolt, 30, of Albertville, was arrested in Albertville on the charge of domestic assault.

On March 12, Brandon Ralph Guertin, 20, of Monticello, was arrested in Buffalo on a Wright County apprehension and detention order for 5th degree possession of a controlled substance violation.

On March 12, Nicole Marie Varhol, 28, of Buffalo, was arrested in Buffalo on the charge of 3rd degree DWI.

On March 12, John Lee Faris, 37, of Hayes, VA, was arrested in Clearwater on the charge of domestic assault.

On March 13, Daniel Jonathan Miller, 30, of St. Michael, was arrested in St. Michael on the charge of 2nd degree DWI.

On March 13, David Kyle Gilbert, 42, of St. Cloud, was arrested in Monticello on the charges of 4th and 5th degree possession of a controlled substance and possession of counterfeit currency.

On March 13, Adam Eldon Switala, 31, of Monticello, was arrested in Otsego on the charges of 5th degree possession of a controlled substance and false information to law enforcement, Wright County warrants for 3rd and 5th degree possession of a controlled substance and a Hennepin County warrant for 1st degree sale of a controlled substance.

On March 13, Carly Sue Skarsten, 28, of Champlin, was arrested in Monticello on the charge of 3rd degree possession of a controlled substance.

On March 13, Jeremy Alan Hillukka, 42, no permanent address, was arrested in Monticello on the charge of indecent exposure.

On March 13, Aaron Micah Lutterman, 38, of Monticello, was arrested in Monticello on the charge of domestic assault.

On March 14, Elisha Denise McMorris, 33, of Aberdeen, SD, was arrested in Delano on the charge of false information to law enforcement.

On March 14, Stacy Louann Simon, 47, of Annandale, was arrested in Maple Lake on an Anoka County warrant for theft.

There were 9 Property Damage Accidents, 2 Personal Injury Accidents, 2 Hit and Run Accidents and 4 Car Deer Accidents.

There were 5 arrests for DWI, No Underage Consumption arrests, no School Bus Stop Arm Violations and 107 tickets for miscellaneous traffic violations reported this week.

This press release was produced by the Wright County Government. The views expressed here are the author's own.


For the Seventh Circuit

The federal courts currently have sufficient funds on hand to maintain normal operations, including CJA payments, through January 31, 2019. In the event of a prolonged shutdown, the Clerk's Office will post additional information regarding operations as we obtain further directions from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

In light of the fact that the court's operations will not be interrupted by the shutdown, filing dates are not automatically extended. The clerk's office will be happy to work with any attorney affected by the shutdown, but motions to continue must be filed in order to extend due dates which fall during the shutdown.

Please contact the Clerk's Office for additional information.

The Court will be closed on Friday, June 18, 2021 , in observance of the Juneteenth Day holiday.

The Dirksen Courthouse will be closed on Monday, August 10, 2020 , due to police activity in the downtown area, street closures and transportation disruptions. Remote court proceedings may continue.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Chief Judge Sykes is pleased to announce that the Judicial Council of the Seventh Circuit has appointed Sarah O. Schrup, currently the Deputy Circuit Executive, to succeed Mr. Collins Fitzpatrick as Circuit Executive.

Ms. Schrup will assume her new role on September 29, 2021. Mr. Fitzpatrick retires on September 28, shortly after marking the 50th anniversary of his service to the Seventh Circuit.

Please see the announcement for details.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Notice to counsel and the public:

Re: Order Regarding COVID-19

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will continue to operate under the Continuity of Operations Plan activated on March 18, 2020. See order for further details.

Pursuant to this order, all cases scheduled for oral argument through August 31, 2021, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by video communications, with audio livestreamed to YouTube. The clerk’s office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Please see the Vacancies page for details.

Notice is hereby given that the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit,
pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 2071 proposes modification of Circuit Rule 46(b).

Deletions are shown by strikeouts. New text is underlined. See the details here.

Written comments on the proposed rule changes were accepted by May 17, 2021, to:

Advisory Committee
c/o Clerk of Court
United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
219 South Dearborn Street - Room 2722
Chicago, Il 60604

Notice to counsel and the public:

Re: Order Regarding COVID-19

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will continue to operate under the Continuity of Operations Plan activated on March 18, 2020. See order for further details.

Pursuant to this order, all cases scheduled for oral argument through June 30, 2021, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by video communications, with audio livestreamed to YouTube. The clerk’s office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

This order pertains to the Everett McKinley Dirksen United States Courthouse located at 219 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL, and the Stanley J. Roszkowski United States Courthouse located at 327 S. Church Street, Rockford, IL.

Effective immediately, all persons seeking entry to, or occupying the courthouses, must wear a face covering or mask in the public areas of the courthouses. Masks may be either manufactured or homemade and should be a solid piece of material without slits, exhalation valves, or punctures. A face shield, bandana, or neck gaiter alone does not count as a face covering. A face shield and/or goggles may be used in addition to an acceptable mask, but by themselves do not substitute for the use of a mask.

Any visitor seeking entry into the courthouse without a mask will be offered a free disposable mask at the security screening station if they need to enter the courthouse.

Any person found to have violated this Order may be held in contempt of court, cited, and/or expelled from the courthouses until an order of the Chief Circuit or District Judge, upon petition, reinstates access to the courthouses.

Re: Procedures for the Filing, Service, and Management of Highly Sensitive Documents

In accordance with a directive from the Administrative Office of the U. S. Courts, this Court has issued an order regarding the filing of Highly Sensitive Document material.
Please see the order for further details.

Notice to counsel and the public:

Re: Order Regarding COVID-19

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will continue to operate under the Continuity of Operations Plan activated on March 18, 2020. See order for further details.

Pursuant to this order, all cases scheduled for oral argument through April 30, 2021, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by video communications, with audio livestreamed to YouTube. The clerk’s office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

Re: Order Regarding COVID-19

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will continue to operate under the Continuity of Operations Plan activated on March 18, 2020. See order for further details.

Pursuant to this order, all cases scheduled for oral argument through December 31, 2020, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by video communications. The clerk’s office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case. The courtroom will remain closed to the public. Arguments will be livestreamed to YouTube and recordings will be posted on the court’s web page.

If the appeal can be resolved based on the briefs and record and the decisional process would not be significantly aided by oral argument, see FED. R. APP. P. 34(a), counsel may file a motion under Circuit Rule 34(e) to waive oral argument. The court encourages counsel to confer with opposing counsel when considering a motion to waive oral argument and prefers joint motions. A motion to waive oral argument must be filed no later than seven days before the date of argument.

This order pertains to the Everett McKinley Dirksen United States Courthouse located at 219 S. Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL, and the Stanley J. Roszkowski United States Courthouse located at 327 S. Church Street, Rockford, IL.

Effective immediately, all persons seeking entry to the courthouses must wear a face covering or mask that completely covers the wearer's nose and mouth. Any person violating this order may be held in contempt and/or expelled from the Courthouses.

All cases scheduled for oral argument through August 31, 2020, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by Zoom Video Communications. The Clerk's Office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

The courtroom will be closed to the public. The Court, on a temporary basis, will live stream the audio from oral arguments to YouTube. Arguments will also be recorded and posted on the court’s website. If all parties agree among themselves to waive oral argument, they may jointly file a motion with the court seeking permission to do so.

All cases scheduled for oral argument through June 30, 2020, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by Zoom Video Communications. The Clerk's Office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

The courtroom will be closed to the public. The Court, on a temporary basis, will live stream the audio from oral arguments to YouTube. Arguments will also be recorded and posted on the court’s website. If all parties agree among themselves to waive oral argument, they may jointly file a motion with the court seeking permission to do so.

All cases scheduled for oral argument in May 2020, will be argued by counsel either telephonically or by Zoom Video Communications. The Clerk’s Office will contact counsel with remote argument instructions for their specific case.

The courtroom will be closed to the public. The Court, on a temporary basis, will live stream the audio from oral arguments to YouTube. Arguments will also be recorded and posted on the court’s website. If all parties agree among themselves to waive oral argument, they may jointly file a motion with the court seeking permission to do so.

The courtroom will be closed to the public. Arguments will be recorded and posted on the court’s website. If all parties agree among themselves to waive oral argument, they may jointly file a motion with the court seeking permission to do so.

All FRAP Rule 33 mediations will be conducted by telephone until further notice.

Please advise the Circuit Mediation Office if your contact information should change.

Please see the Circuit Mediation page for details.

Here is a link to the video of the memorial: https://vimeo.com/386481229

The Committee, which includes judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and law professors, welcomed comment before submission of the proposed revision to the Circuit Council for approval and promulgation. Comments were to be sent by e-mail to [email protected], with a subject line of “Pattern Jury Instruction Comment.”

Judge McCord took office on May 20, 2019. She will succeed Bankruptcy Judge Basil H. Lorch, III.

Respondents were asked to email comments to [email protected], with a subject line of “Pattern Jury Instruction Comment.”

The Committee accepted comments through March 15, 2019.

Please see the announcement for details.
December 3, 2018
The Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure have been updated effective December 1, 2018.

Please see the Rules page for details.
December 3, 2018
The 7th Circuit Bar Association held a free CLE:
How to Handle a Seventh Circuit Pro Bono Appeal

Everett McKinley Dirksen United States Courthouse
219 S. Dearborn Street,
Ceremonial Courtroom, Room 2525
Chicago, IL 60604

The commenting period ended November 20, 2018.

Please see the Pattern Jury Instructions page for details.
September 18, 2018
The Pattern Criminal Jury Instructions have been updated.
Please see the Pattern Jury Instructions page for details.

August 28, 2018
CM/ECF - NEXTGEN Implementation

Please Note: On Monday, September 10, 2018, the NEXTGEN CM/ECF System conversion was completed.

Please see the Case Information-NEXTGEN page for details.
June 15, 2018
EEO Plan

The Policy on Equal Employment Opportunity, Discrimination, Harassment, and Employment Dispute Resolution for the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit has been updated.
May 24, 2018
On March 23, 2018, this court issued notice that it proposed modifications to Circuit Rule 10 and the rescission of Circuit Rule 11.

The court has carefully considered the comments received. The court hereby provides notice of the adoption of the modifications to Circuit Rule 10 and the rescission of Circuit Rule 11. The adoption of the modifications to Circuit Rule 10 and the rescission of Circuit Rule 11 shall be effective immediately.
May 1, 2018
Seventh Circuit Operating Procedure 11: Video-Recording Policy has been added.

Please see the Rules page for details.
April 23, 2018
Video Segments on Appellate Practice Topics

The Seventh Circuit Bar Association has prepared video segments on the steps in an appeal that will be very helpful to many lawyers. Each topic that you may encounter in appellate practice will have a separate segment and you will be able to listen to experts in the field on each of these matters as your appeal progresses. So if you are preparing for an oral argument, you click on the oral argument segment and you will hear from an appellate practitioner and a Circuit Judge on how to prepare for your argument and what to expect on the day you give it. We hope you will find these segments useful.

Notice is hereby given that the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit,
pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 2071, proposed the modification of Circuit Rule 10 and
the recision of Circuit Rule 11.

Deletions are shown by strikeouts. New text is highlighted. See the details here.

Written comments on the proposed rule changes were to be sent by April 25, 2018, to:

Advisory Committee
c/o Clerk of Court
United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
219 South Dearborn Street - Room 2722
Chicago, Il 60604

In the event of a federal government shutdown on Friday, March 23, 2018, the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit will be open for business as usual on Monday, March 26, 2018.

The federal courts currently have sufficient funds on hand to maintain normal operations, including CJA payments, through April 6, 2018. In the event of a prolonged shutdown, the Clerk's Office will post additional information regarding operations as we obtain further directions from the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

In light of the fact that the court's operations will not be interrupted by the shutdown, filing dates are not automatically extended. The clerk's office will be happy to work with any attorney affected by the shutdown, but motions to continue must be filed in order to extend due dates which fall during the shutdown. Please contact the Clerk's Office for additional information.

Please see the Clerkships page for details.

A copy of the plan is posted on the OSCAR website at:
https://oscar.uscourts.gov/federal_law_clerk_hiring_pilot.

December 27, 2017
Chief Judge Diane Wood has appointed a committee to examine the process for raising claims of harassment in connection with employment in the courts of the Seventh Circuit. Please see the details of the announcement.
December 1, 2017
Amendment to Federal Rule of Appellate Procedure Rule 4: Subdivision (a)(4)(B)(iii).

This technical amendment restores the former subdivision (a)(4)(B)(iii) that was inadvertently deleted in 2009. On December 14, 2016, the Office of the Law Revision Counsel in the U.S. House of Representatives advised that Rule 4(a)(4)(B)(iii) had been deleted by a 2009 amendment to Rule 4. The deletion of this subdivision in 2009 was inadvertent. The OLRC deleted subdivision (iii) from its official document, but the document from which the rules are printed was not updated to show the deletion. As a result, Rule 4(A)(4)(B)(iii) was published with subdivision (iii) in place. This technical amendment restores subdivision (iii) to Rule 4(A)(4)(B).

While paper will remain the official form of filing as under existing practice, parties represented by counsel will also be required to submit most documents through the new electronic filing system. Attorneys who expect to file documents electronically will need to register in advance for the system.

Prepared By The Committee on Pattern Civil Jury Instructions of the Seventh Circuit.

[The Circuit’s Committee on Pattern Civil Jury Instructions has, with the permission of the Circuit Counsel, revised Parts 6 and 7 of the earlier version. The Committee is continuing to revise and supplement the existing pattern instructions. ] (revised August, 2017

The Seventh Circuit has a new website design.

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July 5, 2017 - WorkCompWire

Baton Rouge, LA – Governor John Bel Edwards recently announced appointments to several Louisiana boards and commissions, including the Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council. The Workers’ Compensation Advisory Council is responsible for monitoring and reporting to the governor and the legislature on the implementation…[Continue Reading]


10 States Most at Risk of Disaster

Disasters can happen anywhere and at any time. But some places experience more than their fair share of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, winter storms and severe weather--so much so that certain locales earn frightening nicknames, such as Tornado Alley. No matter where you live, make sure you have the right kinds and necessary amounts of insurance coverage to protect your finances.

So where do these damaging events occur most frequently and severely? Kiplinger.com worked with the National Weather Service to identify the ten states that have suffered the biggest estimated property losses from disasters over the past eight years. Take a look.

Period measured is October 2006 through March 2015.

1. New Jersey

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $26.4 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: powerful wind, winter storms, floods

  • Most Costly Disasters: floods, powerful wind
  • Homeowners who live along the coast or in areas where there are frequent storms should take steps before hurricane season begins to protect their homes and finances from damage. Here’s how to protect yourself from spring and summer storms.

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 85

New Jersey earns the top spot on this list, in large part due to damage wrought by Sandy--which had weakened from a hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone by the time it the Jersey Shore--in October 2012. The state was among the hardest hit by Sandy, which was the second-costliest storm in U.S. history, after Hurricane Katrina. Many homes and businesses were destroyed along the Jersey Shore, and a portion of the Atlantic City Boardwalk washed away. Shortly after Sandy hit, another storm brought wet snow that caused more power outages and damage.

2. Texas

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $24.5 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: hail, drought, powerful wind, floods

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 304

Severe thunderstorms and tornadoes are nearly as common as tumbleweed on Lone Star plains. Even when funnel clouds don’t touch down, hail pummels crops and cars alike. Also, cities on or near the southern coast, such as Galveston and Houston, are often in the bulls-eye of destructive hurricanes (such as Hurricane Ike in 2008) that gain strength over the Gulf of Mexico. And wildfires--such as the 2011 Bastrop fire that destroyed more than 1,500 homes--have been common due to extreme heat and drought conditions in the state over the past few years. Heavy rains this spring and summer should bring relief from fire as well as the underlying drought.

3. Tennessee

Most Frequent Disasters: powerful wind, hail, winter storms, floods

Severe storms and tornadoes are common in Tennessee, which was among several southern states hit by the historic “super outbreak” of tornadoes in April 2011 more damage and deaths were reported in April of 2014, as well. The state’s capital, Nashville, suffered an estimated $2 billion in damage due to flooding in May 2010, and Memphis had millions of dollars’ worth of damage when the Mississippi River flooded in the spring of 2011. Plus, Tennessee was one of the southern states bitten hard by winter storms in 2014--you may remember the one that brought nearby Atlanta to a halt.

4. Missouri

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $5.0 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: hail, powerful wind, floods

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 331

The tornado that swept through Joplin on May 22, 2011, was one of the deadliest in U.S. history (158 deaths) and generated $2.2 billion in insurance claims, according to an Insurance Information Institute analysis of data from ISO’s Property Claims Service.

If a tornado strikes where your live, follow these seven steps to speed up the insurance claims process.

5. Alabama

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $4.9 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: powerful winds, hail, drought, floods

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 343

Alabama has suffered the most weather-related deaths in the last eight years of any American state. Alabama was hit hard by tornadoes in April 2011, especially in Tuscaloosa and Birmingham, where more than 120 people were killed. In fact, the Yellowhammer State is second only to Oklahoma for the number of EF5 tornadoes (the largest in intensity and area) that have struck there.

6. Oklahoma

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $4.5 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: hail, thunderstorms, drought, floods

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2013): 143

The Sooner State has another moniker: Tornado Alley. A massive EF5 tornado devastated Moore, Okla. (pictured left), on May 20, 2013, and the widest tornado on record hit El Reno, Okla., just 11 days later. Severe storms and twisters are so much a part of the state's weather that the National Severe Storms Laboratory and the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center are located here.

Homeowners in tornado-prone states should set aside an emergency fund and take photos of all valuables in preparation for an insurance claim (in addition, of course, to safety measures like a shelter).

7. Mississippi

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $4.4 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: thunderstorms, hail, tornadoes, floods

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 113

Mississippi frequently is hit by tornadoes and severe storms – twisters killed 16 in 2014 alone . It also has been in the path of several hurricanes--most recently Hurricane Isaac in 2012--that have caused extensive flooding. And don’t forget the river of the same name that runs through the state. Although homeowners insurance covers damage due to wind, it doesn’t cover flood damage. You have to purchase a policy through the National Flood Insurance Program. For more information, see Protect Your Home With Flood Insurance.

8. Louisiana

Infrogmation of New Orleans/Flickr

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $3.7 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: powerful wind, hail, floods, tornadoes

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 72

Note that our recording period begins after the costliest disaster in U.S. history: Hurricane Katrina, which devastated low-lying Louisiana in 2005. Louisiana again suffered flooding when Hurricane Isaac hit in 2012, though losses of life and property were thankfully only a shadow of Katrina. If you live in a flood-prone area, don’t wait until storm clouds gather to buy a flood policy typically, there’s a 30-day waiting period before premiums take effect.

9. Colorado

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $3.6 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: winter storms, hail, drought

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 78

Record rainfall during September 2013 led to floods that killed nine people and caused widespread destruction in several Colorado cities, according to the National Climatic Data Center. The Centennial State also suffered the most damages among western states where wildfires broke out in the summer of 2012. If you live in a state where wildfires are common, it’s important to know what your homeowners policy covers and the difference between assessed value and actual replacement value. Too many people learn only after a fire that they were underinsured.

But the most common weather-related cause of death in Colorado is neither fire nor water (at least, not in liquid form): It’s avalanches, which killed 41 during our measuring period.

10. Arizona

Estimated Property Damage (2006-2015): $3.3 billion

Most Frequent Disasters: powerful wind, floods, heavy rain

Weather-Related Fatalities (2006-2015): 78

Drought conditions have plagued Arizona for the past several years. As a result, the state has seen outbreaks of wildfires, including its largest on record in 2011. The Wallow Fire burned more than 500,000 acres in eastern Arizona. And in 2010 a series of severe thunderstorms produced numerous tornadoes and hail around Phoenix, causing an estimated $2 billion in damage. Finally, Arizona was hammered by sub-zero temperatures in the winter of 2013 that froze water supply pipes in the Navajo Nation.

Keep in mind that if your home is damaged, you should file a claim only if it’s several hundred dollars more than your insurance deductible. Frequent small claims can lead to a rate hike.


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