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Robert Howarth

Robert Howarth



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Robert Howarth was born in Preston in 1865. He initially played rugby before taking up football. He joined Preston North End and made his debut for the club in 1883.

A talented full back, he represented Lancashire and the North of England against the South of England.

In January, 1884, Preston North End played the London side, Upton Park, in the FA Cup. After the game Upton Park complained to the Football Association that Preston was a professional, rather than an amateur team. The manager, William Sudell, admitted that his players were being paid but argued that this was common practice and did not breach regulations. However, the FA disagreed and expelled them from the competition.

Preston North End now joined forces with other clubs who were paying their players, such as Aston Villa and Sunderland. In October, 1884, these clubs threatened to form a break-away British Football Association. The Football Association responded by establishing a sub-committee, which included Sudell, to look into this issue. On 20th July, 1885, the FA announced that it was "in the interests of Association Football, to legalise the employment of professional football players, but only under certain restrictions". Clubs were allowed to pay players provided that they had either been born or had lived for two years within a six-mile radius of the ground.

Under the leadership of Major William Sudell, Preston North End became one of the best clubs in England. In the first round of the FA Cup in 1887-88, Preston beat Hyde 26-0. This is the highest score ever recorded in the competition. Preston played West Bromwich Albion in the final that year. According to reports, Preston was much the better team and Bob Roberts, the WBA goalkeeper made good saves from Fred Dewhurst, Jimmy Ross, John Goodall and George Drummond. Dewhurst did eventually score but WBA won the game 3-1.

Robert Howarth played his first game for England in February, 1887. England beat Ireland 7-0. The following year he was joined by his full-back partner, Bob Holmes and the club's centre-forward, John Goodall, in the England team.

In March, 1888, William McGregor, a director of Aston Villa, circulated a letter suggesting that "ten or twelve of the most prominent clubs in England combine to arrange home and away fixtures each season." The following month the Football League was formed. It consisted of six clubs from Lancashire (Preston North End, Accrington, Blackburn Rovers, Burnley and Everton) and six from the Midlands (Aston Villa, Derby County, Notts County, Stoke, West Bromwich Albion and Wolverhampton Wanderers). The main reason Sunderland was excluded was because the other clubs in the league objected to the costs of travelling to the North-East.

The first season of the Football League began in September, 1888. Over 6,000 people turned up to Deepdale to see Preston North End play the first game against Burnley. Preston's Fred Dewhurst scored a goal after only two minutes. Samuel Thompson put them two-up after five minutes and they went onto win the game 5-2. Preston North End won the first championship that year without losing a single match and acquired the name the "Invincibles". Eighteen wins and four draws gave them a 11 point lead at the top of the table. Howarth was one of the stars of the side.

Preston also beat Wolverhampton Wanderers 3-0 to win the 1889 FA Cup Final. The goals were scored by Jimmy Ross, Fred Dewhurst and Samuel Thompson. Preston won the competition without conceding a single goal.

Preston also won the Football League the following season. This time it was much closer as they only beat Everton by one point. Preston lost the title to Everton in 1890-91. They also lost Howarth who was attracted away to their main rivals by higher wages.

Howarth played 59 games for Everton over the next two years. He also captained the side that was defeated by Wolverhampton Wanderers in the 1893 FA Cup Final. Howarth returned to Preston North End in 1894 but only managed three more league games before retiring from football to concentrate on his solicitor's practice in Preston.

Robert Howarth died in 1938.


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In 1976, in the year that Robert J. Howarth was born, The United States celebrated the Bicentennial of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. It was a year long celebration, with the biggest events taking place on July 4th.

In 1980, on December 8th, ex-Beatle John Lennon was shot and killed by Mark David Chapman in front of his home - the Dakota - in New York City. Chapman was found guilty of murder and still remains in jail.

In 1982, on June 30th, time ran out on the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). The Amendment had only received 35 of the necessary 38 state ratifications. First sent to the states in 1972, the Amendment stated that "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex".

In 1988, on December 16th, 1988 the popular film Rain Man was released. Featuring Dustin Hoffman and Tom Cruise. this film brought attention to autistic savants and was based on the "megasavant" Laurence Kim Peek. The film would later go to win four Oscars including Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, Best Director and Best Actor in a Leading Role.


Robert Howarth Ph.D.

Prof. Robert Howarth is an Earth systems scientist and ecosystem biologist. Some of his areas of research include the application of science to sustaining the biosphere biogeochemistry and aquatic ecosystem science global and regional nitrogen and phosphorus cycles global methane cycle environmental consequences of biofuels the role of trace gases in global warming and climate disruption and environmental management and the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems.

Prof. Howarth was a staff scientist in Woods Hole, joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1985, and was appointed David R. Atkinson Professor of Ecology & Environmental Biology in 1993. He is the founding editor of the journal Biogeochemistry and served as editor-in-chief for more than 20 years. Since 2014, he has been editor-in-chief of the journal Limnology & Oceanography. He has published over 200 scientific papers, reports, and book chapters. His most recent book is the 4th edition of the text Essentials of Ecology (2014). In 2011, Prof. Howarth published the first comprehensive analysis of the greenhouse gas footprint of shale gas in Climatic Change Letters and an invited commentary on shale gas in Nature. This work was cited in over 1,500 newspapers globally, and gained him an honorable mention as one of “50 People who Matter” in the annual Time 2011 Person of the Year issue.


Robert Howarth Haslam

Children - Robert Willams Haslam, Evan Haslam, John Howarth Haslam, Sarah Haslam, William Nugent Haslam, Hettie Ann Haslam, Margaret Mary Haslam, Clarissa Haslam, Byron Haslam, Leone Esther Haslam, David Jeremy Haslam

History - Robert Howarth Haslam was the first child born to John R. Haslam and Mary Howarth, natives of Bury, Lancashire, England, who left for the United States on the ship, Ellen Maria, sailing January 10, 1853, bound for New Orleans. They were among the Mormon pioneers that crossed the plains in 1853 with the Cyrus Wheelock company, arriving in Salt lake City, Utah on October 15, 1853.

Esther Catherine Williams was born May 27, 1857 in Llanegwad, Carmarthenshire, Wales, to Evan Williams and Sarah Jeremy. The Williams family left Wales on April 9, 1861, sailing from Liverpool, England on April 16, 1861 on the packet ship, Manchester, under the direction of Claudius V Spencer. They arrived in New York on May 18, 1861, having with them their children, Thomas Jeremy, Mary, William Nugent, Sarah Jane, David Jeremy, Esther Catherine and Ann.

That same year their company with ox teams, started across the plains, and all walked that were able to do so, including four year old Catherine.Their mother, Sarah, became ill when they reached Florence, Nebraska, and the little family was forced to stay there for six weeks so the balance of the company went on without them. During this period Evan Williams began to understand the Gospel, accepted it and was baptized. They journeyed on with the next company, and when they reached the Sweetwater in Wyoming, little three year old Ann died of Scarlet Fever.

A son, John, was born and buried while they were on their journey west. The family arrived in Salt lake City on September 23, 1861 in the last ox team company, under the direction of Captain Ansel P. Harmon. It was also known as the John W. Young Company.

John R. Haslam built a small adobe home at Sixth West between Second and Third North Streets. Robert Howarth was born the 15th of August 1854 , even before the roof was on their little home, and he often told how they had to move the bed from one side of the room to the other in an attempt to shield mother and babe from the hot August sun.

Robert Howarth Haslam was one of seven children, having six brothers and sisters. He also had six half brothers and sisters. Little is known of his childhood years, but as a young man, he became a carpenter by trade, working for the company of Asper & Noall for many years, as did his brother, John William.

Robert met Esther Catherine Williams, whom he courted for about three years, and they were married the 30th of June, 1881, in the Old Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Robert built their first home at 244 North Fifth West where they went as bride and groom. He had left the carpenter trade, had gone into partnership with Charles Hill in a store located at First North near Fourth West Street. At a later date, he and some of his brothers, started a grocery business uptown, but he, finally using his carpenter experience, built a butcher shop and grocery store in front of one side of his home and went into business for himself. There were two or three bedrooms, a parlor, dining room, and kitchen in the home. As his family increased in size, he built three more bedrooms over the store. There was no indoor plumbing. There was an outhouse. It was years before a bathroom was built into the house.

Eleven children were born to Robert Howarth and Esther Catherine Williams Haslam. The children in order of their births are Robert Williams, Evan, John Howarth, Sarah, William Nugent, Hettie Ann, Margaret Mary, Clarissa, Byron, Leone Esther, and David Jeremy. They also added to their family in 1905 a grand daughter, Esther Sarah, six months old, who was left motherless through the death of their daughter-in-law, Miriam Taylor Haslam, of Bright’s Disease and Scarlet Fever.

Esther Catherine was a hard-working mother in her home as was her husband in the store. She was also a woman of high principles and great faith. Her hospitality was shared by all who knew her. Anyone coming into the home for a chat or afternoon visit was invited to partake of whatever food was available at the time, whether it was a large meal already prepared for the family, or a small hastily prepared lunch of cold meats, cheese, milk and bread.

Aunt Mary Jeremy had a house on the corner of 5th West and 2nd North. My mother looked after many of the needs of Aunt Mary. We children used to run errands for her also. Because of my mother’s goodness to her, Aunt Mary left her home to mother when she died. My father and mother had the house torn down as it was very old. In 1913 father built a lovely nine room home and a duplex on that corner. Dave and Erma lived in the duplex for some time. The family live in the big house, but when father died, mother and Esther moved into the duplex Dave and Erma moved into the big house. Their oldest son, Robert Williams Haslam moved into their home at 244 North 5th West when the family moved from 244 North 5th West to the big house.

Several of the children were old enough to help in the business,. Robert H. Haslam was very industrious, working early and late, and his establishment became well known in the community, and was maintained by three of his sons after he retired with Robert Williams, the oldest son, manager and butcher, and his two younger brothers, Byron and David, managed the produce, foods, and mercantile part.

Robert Howarth Haslam was active in the Church, and during the past few years of his life, he worked daily in the Salt lake Temple. He was always ready and willing to do the Lord’s work. Two of his sons were called upon to fill missions for the Church--Robert Williams to England and David Jeremy to the Central States in the United States.

As one daughter, Hettie Ann, wrote, “I remember our family and home life to be very happy and secure. We worked together as a family in all the chores that had to be done around the house helping our mother and helping our father in his store. Our father was a kind, loving father, but he was also very firm in what he expected us as children. There was one thing he would never put up with--sassing our mother. Esther Catherine Haslam was very loving also, but it was a little easier to get favors from her, although she would always abide by what father said. Mother had a black leather strap hanging up on the stairs leading downstairs, and all she needed to do was mention using the strap and we soon straightened right up! Seldom did she have to use it on us.”

“Our little sister, Sarah, died in 1877 when she was only nine months old of the Measles. Our dear brother, William, contracted Diptheria when he was a young, single man of 28 years. The disease paralyzed his throat. He passed away on March 12, 1916. He also had such a high fever with the disease which also helped to cause his death. Our brother, John, left home one day with his friend, the Emertson boy, and it was two years before John came home again, although he kept in touch with the family. He first stayed in Nevada and then went to California, where he learned the carpentry trade which he used the rest of his life.”

𠇊s children we congregated either in the kitchen or in the dining room, doing our studies around the dining room table. There ws no central heating so we had a stove in the kitchen and dining room, and a heater in the parlor later on. We seldom used the parlor in the winter except for special occasions. I remember when my brother, Evan, paid for the first electrical fixture we ever had in the parlor.”

𠇌hristmas was a special time. We always hung up our stocking and got the wonderful treat of an orange. My brother, Rob, would always put a piece of coal in all of our stockings when he got older. Our first Christmas tree was one brought all the way from Kaysville by Brother Webster. The trip was so long that he always had to stay overnight with us. Our decorations on the tree were candles which we always lit, strings of popcorn, cranberries, and several homemade paper chains.”

Mother had an old washing machine that had to be turned by hand. It had a wooden dolly to hold the clothes. Because it was such hard work, Brother Betts, who was the janitor of the Sixteenth Ward, was hired to turn the washer for mother. He was small of stature, but he was strong, and he would take the handle and turn it right and then left and back again, while he sang hymns the whole time. He knew the batch was done by how many verses he had sung.”

“Mother always cooked on a cola stove. She never did have any other kind of stove in her entire life. She did not want any other. It had a reservoir on the side, and with this and every kettle in the house, we heated water for our weekly bath on Saturday night. Mother would put a big wash tub between two chairs and fill it with clean water and bathe three or four little ones, empty the water and refill with clean water and start the procedure over again until everyone had a bath.”

House cleaning included lots of hard work on the part of everyone. My brother, John, would get in one corner of a room, and I would be in the other corner. We would clean on our hands and knees until we met in the middle. Mother always made new carpets each year at cleaning time. They were made from old rags that were kept for this purpose. We girls had a lot of ironing to do to help our mother. We had heavy irons that we heated on the coal stove and lifting them wore us out. My father wore butcher aprons in his store every day as he handled the meats. They were made out of white linen. We had to boil them to get them clean. I can remember ironing ten to twelve each week for him.”

"The mode of transportation in those days was either horse and buggy or the streetcars that went down 5th West to town. Because we lived so close to town, we generally walked. On special occasions, we would, as a family, travel in our horse and buggy to Liberty Park for a picnic. Mother would make a huge lunch and pack it in a big wash basket. There was no waxed paper of foil to put the sandwiches or cake in so she would wrap them in a clean dish towel. My father also had a delivery wagon pulled by a horse to deliver his groceries to his customers. Later there were outings in the family car to such spots as Brighton in Big Cottonwood Canyon, visits to Como Springs, and Saratoga. Seldom if ever, did we have ‘store-bought’ clothes. We shopped at the only good store at that time, ZCMI.”

Because my father had a grocery and meat store, we never went without good meals. Many times on a Saturday night, my father would bring two or three roasts that had been left over, and my mother would line them up in a large roaster and cook them together. Sunday breakfasts were always a delight, with veal chops selected personally from the family store by our father--eggs, home-made graham muffins, etc.”

“My folks were very religious and always went to Church. The gospel meant a lot to them. Because there were always so many little ones at home, with a family of eleven, mother and father would take turns staying home with the little ones, while the other one went to Sacrament Meeting. Because she had too many little babies at one time, Mother could never go to Relief Society, but I remember Rachel Folland, Emily Lewis, and Mrs. Cottam from the 16th ward Relief Society coming over to the house often after their meeting and mother would serve them lunch and they would visit.”

𠇊ll of our pleasure and recreation stemmed from our Ward activities. We always went to the Ward picture shows on the week end. The biggest majority of the young people were LDS in those days, and we had much in common. I remember that every single one of our neighbors were LDS also.”

“When father built our new house, that put us in the 28th Ward, and many times we would take the train up Emigration Canyon to the lovely big resort hotel, Pinecrest. We were never able to eat in the hotel, as it was for the rich, but we would look around then eat our picnic out in the canyon. My mother’s brother, William, who ran the Williams Furniture Store next to ZCMI, owned a cabin in Emigration Canyon, and we took trips up there occasionally.”

“In 1927 mother, accompanied by Mary Nebeker, a family friend, grand daughter Esther and her friend, took a trip on the Yellow Stages to Los Angeles to visit her daughter, Clarissa. By today’s accommodations, it left much to be desired, but was quite an eventful trip, and although she was 70 years of age at the time, she withstood the rigors of the forerunner of the Greyhound bus very well, especially the heat of the desert, with wind and sand blowing on through the windows, which had to be kept open for the only air conditioning they had.”

“It was indeed a sad day for the whole family when on the 20th of January, 1930 Robert Howarth Haslam passed away in Salt lake City at the age of 75. He was on the roof of his second-story house shoveling snow off the roof when the stress from shoveling caused him to have a strangulated hernia.”

After Robert Haslam’s death in 1930,his widow and grand daughter, Esther, moved to a small house next door which was also owned by the family where they lived in very comfortable circumstances until Esther Catherine’s death December 28, 1945 at the age of 88.

This devoted couple remained faithful to the Church throughout their lives and brought up their children with a true knowledge of the Gospel.

Information and quotes for this history were taken from the histories of Hettie H. Nelson, daughter, Esther Haslam, granddaughter and edited by Vera Hampshire, granddaughter.


Howarth History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancient history of the Howarth name begins with the ancient Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name is derived from when the family resided in or near the settlement of Haworth in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Hayward's Heath in Sussex is another possible origin of the name. The surname Howarth belongs to the large category of Anglo-Saxon habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

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Early Origins of the Howarth family

The surname Howarth was first found in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Haworth, a chapelry, in the parish of Bradford, union of Keighley, wapentake of Morleywhich. [1] Historically part of Lancashire, the village dates back to 1209 when it was originally listed as Hauewrth. Literally the place name means "enclosure with a hedge," from the Old English words "haga" + "worth." [2]

One of the first records of the family was Robert de Hawrth who was listed in the Pipe Rolls for Yorkshire in 1200. [3]

Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Alicia de Haworth Johannes Haueworth Johannes de Haworth and Otes de Haworth as all holding lands there at that time. [4]

"The Haworths or Howarths are very characteristic of Lancashire, Howorth being of less frequent occurrence. The Haworths of Great Haworth, a very old gentle family, have resided in that place for many centuries the Haworths of Higher Croft branched off from them in the middle of the 17th century whilst those of Sale in Cheshire belong to a still later branch. Haworth was a common Rochdale name in the 16th century. Abraham Hawarth was a Manchester boroughreeve in 1746. Haworth is a place or a seat in the county, but I scarcely think that this is a sufficient explanation of the frequency of a name which, in one form or another, is borne by nearly one in every hundred of Lancashire men." [5]

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Early History of the Howarth family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Howarth research. Another 103 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1609, 1629, 1639, 1616, 1683, 1676, 1679, 1680, 1683, 1767, 1833, 1767, 1793, 1797, 1812, 1817, 1798, 1802 and 1806 are included under the topic Early Howarth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Howarth Spelling Variations

Until quite recently, the English language has lacked a definite system of spelling rules. Consequently, Anglo-Saxon surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. Changes in Anglo-Saxon names were influenced by the evolution of the English language, as it incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other languages. Although Medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, so it is common to find one person referred to by several different spellings of his surname, even the most literate people varied the spelling of their own names. Variations of the name Howarth include Haworth, Howarth and others.

Early Notables of the Howarth family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include Samuel Haworth ( fl. 1683), an empiric, a native of Hertfordshire, and probably the son of William Haworth, who wrote against the Hertford Quakers (1676). In 1679 he was a 'student of physic' living next door to the Dolphin in Sighs Lane, and dealing in quack tablets and a tincture. He was patronised by the Duke of York (James II), and admitted an extra-licentiate of the College of Physicians on 12 Oct. 1680. His new way of curing consumption was brought to the notice of Charles II, who ordered him to test it on a case.
Another 182 words (13 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Howarth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Howarth migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Howarth Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
Howarth Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Henry Howarth, who arrived in New York in 1822 [6]
  • Joseph Howarth, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1847 [6]
  • Margaret Howarth, aged 52, who arrived in New York in 1868 [6]
  • Robert Howarth, aged 45, who arrived in New York in 1868 [6]
  • John Howarth, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1868 [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Howarth Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

Howarth migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Howarth Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. James Howarth U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway [Shelburne], Nova Scotia on October 26, 1783 was passenger number 210 aboard the ship "HMS Clinton", picked up on September 28, 1783 at Staten Island, New York [7]

Howarth migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Howarth Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Charles Howarth, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the "Argyle" on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia[8]
  • Mr. William Howarth, English convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Aurora" on 3rd November 1833, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[9]
  • Mr. Henry Howarth, English convict who was convicted in Liverpool, Merseyside, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Blundell" on 13th March 1844, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [10]
  • Mr. James Howarth, English convict who was convicted in Liverpool, Merseyside, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Blundell" on 13th March 1844, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [10]
  • George Howarth, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the "Adelaide" on August 08, 1849, settling in Van Diemen's Land and Port Phillip, Australia[11]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Howarth migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Howarth Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Mr. James Howarth, British settler travelling from London aboard the ship "Slains Castle" arriving in Otago, South Island, New Zealand on 9th November 1852 [12]

Contemporary Notables of the name Howarth (post 1700) +

  • Donald Howarth (b. 1931), English playwright and theatre director
  • Jack Howarth (b. 1945), English retired professional footballer who made over 500 appearances in the Football League, scoring nearly 200 goals
  • Elgar Howarth (b. 1935), English conductor and composer
  • Robert Lever Howarth (1927-2021), British politician, Member of Parliament (MP) for Bolton East (1964-1970), Leader of Bolton Council (1980-2004)
  • Frank Richard Howarth (b. 1951), Australian public servant, Director of the Australian Museum (2004-)
  • Christopher "Chris" Howarth (b. 1960), British Olympic figure skater
  • Valerie Georgina Howarth, Baroness Howarth of Breckland, British politician and a member of the House of Lords
  • John Aubrey Conway "Jack" Howarth MBE (1896-1984), British actor best known for his role as Albert Tatlock in Coronation Street (1960 to 1984)
  • Walter Arthur Harrex Howarth (1882-1958), Australian politician
  • Hedley John Howarth (1943-2008), New Zealand former international cricketer
  • . (Another 7 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Howarth family +

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Mr. Ralph Benton Howarth (1948-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Tauranga, North Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus he died in the crash [13]
Empress of Ireland
  • Miss Emmie Howarth (1910-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Calgary, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [14]
  • Master Melvin Howarth (1909-1914), Canadian Second Class Passenger from Calgary, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [14]
  • Master Leonard Howarth (1909-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Calgary, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mrs. Beatrice Howarth (1883-1914), née Morgan Canadian Third Class Passenger from Calgary, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Wiliam Howarth, Canadian Second Class Passenger from Calgary, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [14]
  • . (Another 1 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Howarth Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Quod ero spero
Motto Translation: I hope that I shall be.


Our Musicians

Robert Howarth has been the Director of Music at the University Church since September 2018. A Conductor and Harpsichordist with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, he studied music at the University of York where he won the Paynter Prize for his “outstanding musical performance”. He conducts regularly for the Grange Festival (Handel’s Agrippina- 2018, Monteverdi’s Ulisse – 2017) and Opera North (Mozart’s Magic Flute – 2019). He has given Masterclasses at the Royal Academy of Music, Trinity Laban Conservatoire, and the Royal Northern College of Music. He is also a coach for the Jette-Parker Young Artists at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden. He conducts regularly across Europe with both Modern and Period Instrument Ensembles. Robert was the Music Director of the play Farinelli and the King, written by Claire Van Kampen and starring Mark Rylance. Following its premiere in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, the production transferred to the West End. In 2018, it had a three-month run on Broadway, to high critical acclaim. Robert's work in the UK has seen him conducting at Opera North (Handel’s Giulio Cesare), Welsh National Opera (Monteverdi’s Ulisse), Glyndebourne (Charpentier – Les descente d’Orphée aux enfers), The Halle Orchestra, Northern Sinfonia, The Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, The English Concert, and The Academy of Ancient Music.

Robert’s work with choirs has seen him many times in Spain conducting their massed-choir Messiahs for the Obra Sociale, La Caixa Concerts Pariticipatius. These performances have been in Barcelona, Madrid, Alicante, Gran Canarias, Bilbao and Seville. Whilst usually taking the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and the Choir of the Enlightenment, he has also conducted the Bilbao Sinfonica and the Royal Orchestra of Seville.


Robert Howarth - History

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Minute Man Emblem For War Bond Sale

Robert Howarth's Sons, metal workers and heating contractors for 70 years, knew how to turn on the heat in the War Bonds Drive. On June 26 they erected a new flag pole in the yard, and in the afternoon the entire personnel of 40 workers gathered for the raising of the Minute Man flag. Alex Samsel, oldest employee, with 23 years service raised the stars and stripes with the new flag beneath. Speakers were M. Herbert Paul for the County, Elmer Martin for Howarth's, and C. Pard Larkin for the U. S. Treasury Department.


Robert Howarth

Who am I?

I am an Earth systems scientist and ecosystem biologist. I earned a B.A. from Amherst College in biology (1974) and a Ph.D. in biological oceanography jointly from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (1979). After several years as a staff scientist in the MBL’s Ecosystem Center, I joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1985 and was appointed the David R. Atkinson Professor of Ecology & Environmental Biology in 1993. I believe that environmental policy should be driven by quality, objective science, and I have had extensive experience with national and international efforts to synthesize such science, including as chair of an NAS committee on coastal ocean nutrient pollution and chair of two projects of the International Council of Science: one on global nitrogen issues and one on the environmental consequences of biofuels. I also served as director of the Oceans Program for the Environmental Defense Fund while on leave from Cornell between 2000 and 2003. I enjoy scientific editing as well. I am the Founding Editor of Biogeochemistry and served as Editor-in-Chief for more than 20 years. Since 2014, I have been the Editor-in-Chief of Limnology & Oceanography, the flagship journal for the Association for the Sciences of Limnology & Oceanography and one of the world’s premier aquatic science journals. I have published over 200 scientific papers, reports, and book chapters. My most recent book is the 4 th edition of the text Essentials of Ecology (Begon, Howarth, and Townsend, 2014).

What do I do?

Jointly with my wife and long-time science colleague Dr. Roxanne Marino, I run a diverse research program involving field measurements, experimentation, and modeling. My research interests include: application of science to sustaining the biosphere biogeochemistry and aquatic ecosystem science global and regional nitrogen and phosphorus cycles global methane cycle environmental consequences of biofuels role of trace gases in global warming and climate disruption life-cycle analysis for greenhouse-gas footprint of energy technologies influence of land-use, management practices, and climate change on nutrient fluxes from the landscape atmospheric deposition of nitrogen onto the landscape controls and consequences of eutrophication in estuaries biotic, physical, and geochemical controls on nitrogen fixation and environmental management and the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems. At Cornell, I teach the graduate class in biogeochemistry and a large freshmen class in ecology & environment.

Why do I come to the MBL?

I love the intellectual fervor of the Woods Hole scientific community, and the MBL’s Ecosystem Center is one of the strongest groups anywhere working on global and ecosystem-scale ecology. Their facilities provide excellent support for our research, and I always enjoy my intellectual discussions with the Center’s staff as well as with researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the Woods Hole Research Center. Roxanne and I have worked at the MBL since 2000 (in addition to our time in the early 1980s) and very much feel part of the community.

What do I work on at the MBL?

My research at the MBL is focused largely on the consequences of nitrogen pollution in West Falmouth Harbor, a 70-hectare seagrass-dominated lagoon 10 km north of Woods Hole. This harbor is the site of an unplanned whole-ecosystem experiment: due to inadvertent contamination of a groundwater aquifer that flows to the harbor, nitrogen inputs increased 3-fold in the early part of this century. We have studied the ecological and biogeochemical consequences since 2004 with funding from the National Science Foundation and Woods Hole SeaGrant. Our study is the only one in the world to evaluate the long-term consequences of a large nitrogen addition (and nitrogen alone, with no increase in other pollutants) on a seagrass-based ecosystem. The source of the nitrogen pollution has now been cleaned up, and with a new 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation awarded May 2017, we intend to examine the trajectory of recovery of the harbor from nitrogen pollution.


Robert Howarth - History

If you are worried about climate change and don't embrace natural gas as a bridge to whatever energy wins the future - solar, hydrogen, nuclear - you don't understand energy density and emissions.

A new paper by Cornell anti-fracking marine ecologist Robert Howarth (funded by the anti-fracking Park Foundation) doesn't try to tackle the physics, he just chooses to ignore it with the goal of undermining the energy which has kept prices for poor people low while reducing CO2 emissions so much that by 2017 the Clean Power Plan, which the Supreme Court had nullified in 2016, was irrelevant. After being scolded years ago for his daft claims that natural gas was worse for the environment than coal, his argument has pivoted but his desire for disinformation still persists more than methane does.(1)

He claims he can detect the difference between methane from fracking and that from other drilling. If you are in the 'I can taste GMOs and speak to dead relatives' crowd, you might believe him. No one with actual expertise in climate science or energy does.

Howarth has been debunked by actual atmospheric scientists at Cornell (2) for his past claims (when you are off by 10 percent, that is bad science, when you are off by 200 percent, it is intentional) but scientists are not his target, the New York Times is. With an unwillingness to ask actual experts the newspaper did fawn over one of his claims, but they were scolded for that by scientists and then their own ombudsman and now he may be hoping to get attention using cosmic assertions even more obscure and hard to prove (thus, impossible to refute, which is what merchants of doubt seek to gain.)

His new claim is that natural gas from fracking has less carbon-13 relative to carbon-12 than methane from both older natural gas wells and coal. Methane contains two elements, carbon and hydrogen, each with two stable isotopes. For carbon, those two are 98.9 percent carbon-12 and 1.1 percent carbon-13 ( 13 C). As you can see, 1.1 percent means fossil carbon is relatively low in 13 C and since methane contains no 14 C tracking carbon-13 is a solid approach to detecting methane. But he doesn't do any science, he simply takes an estimated approach from another paper, compares it to estimates of increased methane (

25 billion tons) and then suggests because his estimate of an estimate does not coincide with measured data, fracking must be causing more methane than would be evident if methane were derived from older technologies, where he just relies on data.

That's not chemistry, it's magic. It's like when agriculture activists insist greedy corporations are irrationally dumping antibiotics on cows and pesticides on plants ignoring that it makes no sense to waste money. Energy companies are no different. They are not throwing methane around like candy at Halloween. It is money going into the air.

Methane has been terrific for North America but activists who endorsed it since the 1960s turned on it once it became viable (just as they did with corn ethanol) because that is their business model, and Howarth has become a darling to them despite having no expertise. So he has to write papers if he wants his funding sources to persist. But this is next level speculation. Instead of conceding it dissipates quickly, which is science, he uses language suggesting the atmosphere spasms more rapidly in the presence of methane. Yet at the levels we are talking about the assertion is silly, it is endocrine disruption or homeopathy for greenhouse gases a belief that trace levels of it will cause an impact. In the voodoo fringe of biology (Fred Vom Saal, Paul Fagan, et al.), environmental activists get away with such gibberish because they can ignore obvious confounders and hope journalists will just rewrite the press release, but physicists are a lot more protective of their field.

So I predict they will be lined up to slam this. Not because they want to defend fracking or any other energy source, but because every time a bad paper gets attention because it seeks to appeal to a large political umbrella, it undermines acceptance in science overall.

(1) The fact remains CO2 is persistent but methane disappears quickly. If we had clean coal, which James Hansen, the father of global warming. embraced, nuclear (ditto), and natural gas, instead of creating problems by banning nuclear and using resources for government-subsidized solar panels and windmills, the IPCC target of 2 degrees would be met without environmental journalists being forced to stop flying around the world to climate conferences.

(2) Fellow Cornell academic Lawrence Cathles, an climate science expert, debunked his claim that natural gas wells are the "methane sieves" Howarth claimed and using decades-old Soviet Union-era data to massage the results didn't endear him to earth scientists either.

I founded Science 2.0® in 2006 and since then it has become the world's largest independent science communications site, with over 300,000,000 direct.


Robert Howarth

Robert Howarth is former Director-Business Development of Veracity Solutions, Inc.

Vice President-Business Development at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Vice President-Delivery at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Vice President-Community at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Former Chief Operating Officer & Principal at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Former Recruiting Director at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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President & Chief Executive Officer at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Founder at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Former Vice President-Strategy at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Former Professional at Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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Veracity Solutions, Inc. provides software consulting services. The company was founded by Michael Richards and Galen E. Murdock in 1998 and is headquartered in Midvale, UT.

Robert Howarth is affiliated with Veracity Solutions, Inc.

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