The story

What are the ruins in Turkey near Kömürcü Köyü?

What are the ruins in Turkey near Kömürcü Köyü?



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

I am curious and I would like to know what the ruins are near Kömürcü Köyü in Turkey (38°15'27.8"N 34°33'05.5"E | 38.257711,34.551535)?

I tried to search but I found nothing. It looks like ancient construction, but maybe it's nothing.


@tohuwawohu and @NSNoob seem to have nailed this in comments. The link from vici.org has Neo-Hittite ruins at 38.259163,34.541790:

and OP's coordinates are in blue for comparison:

The former claims within 5 metres and the separation seems more like 500+ metres but some difference might be accounted for by different datums.

From Hittite Monuments - ie first link in Comments:

Göllüdağ is a large fortified mountain top (2172 m.) settlement of Neo-Hittite period. It is near the village of Kömürcü in Gölcük, Niğde. The settlement dates to the end of 8th century BCE. The ruins are located right next to the crater lake of the inactive volcano. Two large portal lions, known as the Göllüdağ Lions, were found at the south gate of a 112x228 meters sized building that is thought to be the palace. The lions are currently in the Kayseri Museum. Another portal lion and a couple of unfinished sphixes from Göllüdağ are in the Niğde Museum. Göllüdağ excavations were initially made by Remzi Oğuz Arık in 1934. Further excavations were carried out by Burhan Tezcan in 1968-69 and Wolfgang Schirmer in 1992-94.


That's the most prominent site in the Gollu Dag Archaeological Complex. Its a city from the Neo-Hittite Period, which falls roughly in the first half of the Iron Age. The region is archaeologically significant because it is rich in obsidian deposits. There are hundreds of sites dating from the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods, when obsidian was the most sought after raw material. Komurcu Kaletepe is another prominent site in Gollu Dag. The well known Neolithic site of Asikli Hoyuk is not far away.

Source: Göllü Dag (Central Anatolia): obsidian sources, workshops and trade

Another source identifying it as Neo Hittite: Cappadocia Explorer. August, 2009 article in Turkish


10 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Side

If you're looking for a mix of beach time and history, the resort town of Side is prime territory. Huddled along the edge of the Mediterranean coast, Side is all about soaking up the sand and sea, but for those who fancy a slice of culture with their sunbathing, exploring the wealth of Roman-era ruins right in town are one of the most popular things to do here.

The Temple of Athena is beautifully placed on the harbor, with the standing columns looking out to sea, and if you climb to the top tier of seating in the vast Roman theater at the other end of town, you'll get a magnificent view of the stately Taurus Mountains.

More than anything else though, Side is a place to relax and enjoy the sunshine, and although the beaches in town do get packed during the summer months, if you have your own transport, you'll find plenty of less crowded strips of sand within easy reach. For ideas on the best places to visit, see our list of the top tourist attractions in Side.

Note: Some businesses may be temporarily closed due to recent global health and safety issues.


Minuchir Mosque of Ani

View all photos

Today, only one 1000-year-old minaret remains where The Minuchir Mosque of Ani once stood. There are some remains of the mosque’s prayer room, but the lone minaret is a reminder of the fleeting power many rulers experienced during their time in Ani.

Ani was an major metropolis by 11th century standards and had a population well above 100,000 people. The center of the powerful Kingdom of Armenia, Ani was in the middle of a number of trade routes, in modern day Armenia and Eastern Turkey. Although the traffic gave the city diversity and wealth, it also made it vulnerable to attack and conquest.

In 1064, a powerful Seljuk force conquered the city with the help of people from the Caucasus. Killing and enslaving everyone, the Turkish force casually sold the city to a Kurdish dynasty called the Shaddadids. During this time, Ani was transformed from a predominantly Christian and Armenia population to a city with a stronger Islamic presence, and a large mosque was subsequently built.

Unfortunately for the recent Kurdish conquerers, there was constant unrest and Mongols from the east eventually sacked the city in the 13th century. After Mongol rule began, the city slowly declined and has been abandoned since the mid 18th century. Along with a few cathedrals and parts of the city walls, the minaret from the mosque is the most well-preserved relic of the town.

Although It has not been in use for years, when a Russian archeologist began exploring the site in the early 20th century, the mosque was briefly given new life as a storage facility for artifacts.


Termessos

The one city Alexander the Great didn’t bother stopping to conquer, Termessos sits at the top of a mountain near the southern Turkish coast.

Old-growth forest now embrace the tumbled stone ruins of Termessos. Said to have been founded by the mythological hero Bellerophon, during its heyday, the city was known for its impenetrable defense thanks to its mountaintop location, rising over a thousand meters into the sky. In reality it was founded by a community known as the Solims. Little is known of the people or the culture of Termessos despite it being incredibly well preserved, with most of the information gleaned from stories and histories.

The towns remoteness served it well, providing it with some autonomy from Rome and sparing it from being sacked by Alexander the Great who referred to it as “the Eagle’s Nest.” However its remote mountaintop location would also be its downfall. Although little is known, it is believed that the town was abandoned sometime around 200 C.E. an earthquake destroyed the towns aqueduct, cutting off its supply of water. The Solims seemed to have simply walked away leaving a remarkably preserved town behind.

A large number of stone structures and exposed tombs remain on the site, although some of them have been plundered. Because the site is not under strict archeological control many reliefs and inscriptions have been relocated to the nearby Museum of Antalya.

Although it’s a short drive from Antalya, getting there involves a steep hike up the mountain from the top of the road, so it lacks the usual tourist crowds of the southern Turkish coast. Visitors can watch clouds pass by through the empty windows behind the stunning ancient amphitheater, and admire the ancient tombs lining the path up the mountain.

The combination of woodland, ruin, and spectacular mountain vistas makes it well worth the effort despite what Alexander the Great thought.


Contents

The Assyrian King Shalmaneser III (855 BC) established a settlement here named Shitamrat. [ citation needed ] The town was subsequently settled by a number of civilisations and known as Urima (Ώριμα in Greek), [ citation needed ] Qal'a Rhomayta or Hesna d-Romaye (in Aramaic), [ citation needed ] to the Byzantine Greeks it was known as Romaion Koula (Ρωμαίων Κούλα - Roman castle), [ citation needed ] and the Arab caliphate changed this name to Qal'at al-Rum appropriate for being a border castle at the time. [ citation needed ]

The town was fortified and was besieged by the Mameluks in 1280, [ citation needed ] who conquered the outlying Christian villages but were unable to break into the Rumkale fortress, which eventually fell to the Mameluk Sultan al-Ashraf in 1290. [ citation needed ] The Mameluks repaired the city walls and renamed the place Qal'at al-Muslimin although the names Urumgala and Rumkale persisted. [ citation needed ] The town was brought under Ottoman rule by Selim I. [ citation needed ]

As part of the Southeastern Anatolia Project, aka GAP, several dams were constructed in the area and surrounding regions as part of a larger agricultural and economic initiative by the Turkish Government. The town of Halfeti was among those settlements, ancient and contemporary, that would remain under the rising water levels of the local dams and rivers following the execution of the GAP.

Until the area was flooded in 1999, the people lived from fishing in the Euphrates and farming on the riverbank, especially growing pistachios. Then the waters came and 'new' Halfeti was built. Some buildings, including the jail, were pulled down and rebuilt in the new town. The old town of Halfeti is only partially submerged and is beginning to attract visitors, especially those who hire a ferry to visit the ruins of the nearby fortress of Rumkale (Qal'at ar-Rum). The countryside is also attractive, although the green valley of the past is now underwater.

Opposite Halfeti stood the village of Kale Meydanı, which was also submerged, but the large landowners house was taken and reconstructed in the grounds of Harran University.

The town of Eski Halfeti (Old Halfeti), partially submerged by the rising waters of the Birecik Dam

The town of Eski Savaşan Köyü (Old Savaşan Köyü), partially submerged under the rising waters of the Birecik Dam

Halfeti is composed of the following villages and urban quarters, each headed by a mukhtar: [6]

  • Rüştiye
  • Şimaliye
  • Fırat
  • Siyahgül
  • Karaotlak
  • Arğaç
  • Yeşilözen
  • Cumhuriyet
  • Dutluca
  • Argıl
  • Yukarıgöklü
  • Altınova
  • A.Göklü
  • Balaban
  • Beyburcu
  • Bozyazı
  • Bulaklı
  • Çakallı
  • Çebekoğlu
  • Dergili
  • Durak
  • Erikli
  • Fıstıközü
  • Gözeli
  • Gülaçan
  • Gürkuyu
  • Günece
  • Gürlüce
  • Hilalli
  • Kalkan
  • Kavaklıca
  • Kayalar
  • Kurugöl
  • Macunlu
  • Ortayol
  • Özmüş
  • Salmanlı
  • Savaşan
  • Saylakkaya
  • Sırataşlar
  • Sütveren
  • Tavşanören

In 31 March 2019 local elections the candidate of the Justice and Development Party (AKP), Şeref Albayrak was elected mayor receiving 54,92% of the votes. His first rival Peoples' Democratic Party's candidate Abdurrahman Çiftçi obtained 37.56% of votes. [7] The current Kaymakam is Selami Korkutata. [8]


Offbeat Things to Do in Turkey

Ballooning over Cappadocia

Enjoy the panoramic view of wide settled Turkey while soaring into the sky and enjoying a ride in a hot air balloon. Generally, there are many types of flights which one might choose from. From the deluxe rides to the standard, they offer many options to choose from.

For those looking for solace, they can opt for the deluce one and enjoy the picturesque view of turkey alone from high above. Those who want to have this experience without hurting their pockets, they can go for the standard one, in which they will be accompanied by 16 to 24 people. The duration of flights also haries, you can book a 90 minute or 2 hours flight, depending on your choice.

Featured

Visit the Underground Mosque in Istanbul

The unusual mosque has a storied history where it’s believed that back when the Galata neighborhood was a Genoese settlement, the site was a Byzantine fort. The basement of the fort supposedly helda huge chain that protected the Byzantine locals from Turkish attacks by blocking ships from entering into the city.

Thus if as a traveller, one wishes to indulge in a little bit of history and experience everything first hand and breathe in a little bit of the story this unique location should be a must visit on your trip. Since then, in 1757 the subterranean space was eventually converted into a mosque under the auspices of Grand Vizier Bahir Mustafa Pa?a.

Location: Kemanke? Karamustafa Pa?a, Kemanke? Cd. No:23, 34425 Beyo?lu/?stanbul, Turkey.

Timing: 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM.

Stay at the Gairasu Cave Hotel

The hotel is located in a restored thousand-year-old Byzantine retreat which offers modern conveniences without distracting from the spiritual feeling of the area which has been known to be inhabited for more than five thousand years. Gamirasu cave Hotel is featured in major international travel guides as one of the best cave hotels of Turkey.

It is a perfect destination if you wish to have a quiet cozy honeymoon or just want to take a dip into the tranquility of a simpler life away from the hectic life of the city. If you are looking for some unique things to do in turkey then this place ensures a once in a lifetime experience for anyone who visits.

Location: Ayval? Köyü ?ç Yolu, 50400 Ayval?/Ürgüp/Nev?ehir, Turkey.

Timing: Open 24*7.

Price: Varies for each booking.

Explore the Kekova Island

Only accessible by boats, Kekova island is an absolute beauty to behold. Believed to be the home to the ruins of Simena, a partially sunken city of Lycians, this place holds a storybook charm. Having many stories related to it, it is believed that this place has some of its part within the water, reaching where is not possible.

So we would definitely suggest this gem if you not only wish to add to your unique things to do in Turkey list but also to board over the journey of introspection. The tranquility of the waters and the history of the place will definitely give you an experience of stepping into a book but the lazy airs and the welcoming locals make the place rather perfect for a nice little picnic to be enjoyed with your loved ones.

Don’t miss the Traditional Turkish Bath

Once you are done enjoying what all Turkey has to offer or just want to head towards a break from it we would say head towards the nearest Hamam , a traditional Turkish bath. It would definitely wash off all your stress, worries, germs and exhaustion and what would remain would be the rejuvenated & beautiful you.

People from all over the world visit Turkey to try this once in a lifetime experience and enjoy a fun filled day with their families and friends. Your first hammam experience might be a daunting experience when it comes to the smell, heat etc but try giving it an honest chance and it might be a delightful experience to remember.

Watch Men Oil Wrestle

Oil wrestling is one of the oldest sports in Turkey, included in a historic festival that has been held annually since 1346. Also known as “grease wrestling”, this is the national sport of turkey. The wrestlers are coated in oil followed by an intense session of wrestling in the ring.

This roman tradition of wrestling is still being followed and practised in many corners of Turkey. The coating of oil has a strategic and not just prurient use as it makes the wrestlers slick and tough to get a hold of. Wouldn’t that be interesting to slip through your way trying to beat the opponent.

Location: The best place to experience this spectacular activity would be Karamulser, Samsun, Anatalya and Thrace region.

Go Skiing

From lazing around a hammock to spinning your favourite drink and from skiing in its pristine beaches to watching the sun setting above the horizon, Turkey offers a huge list of activities that can be done around its beaches. Skiing however remains the most adrenaline rushing activity one can experience here.

Enhance your skills while traversing these low as well as high waves and spend a day having fun in the blue waters of many places like Kartepe, Kartalkaya and many more. This water skiing experience will also let you admire the lush marine life as you traverse the waters along the shore.

Location: The country offers an array of destinations like Kartepe, Karatlkaya, Erciyes just to name a few.

Timing: 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Go on Biblical Pilgrimage

Being home to many holy christian sites, a trip to Turkey is often referred to as the biblical pilgrimage. The country is a home to many holy Christian sites like St.Nicholas' Birthplace, Antalya, St.Nicholas Church, Early Christian Settlement, Seven Churches of the Revelation (Ephesus, Pergamon, Smyrna, Laodicea, Sardis, Philadelphia, Thyatira) and Assyrian Orthodox Church of Virgin Mary.

Those who plan a holy visit to Turkey never miss any of these spiritual places. Apart from being a holy place, these locations are also known for their ancient architecture and psychic vibes.

Location: Most of the sites are in Istanbul, Konya, Usak and Antakya.

Timing: 10 AM to 6:00 PM(may vary for each location)

Enjoy the Train Rides

The Turkey train rides are exactly what you would require for a social media account waiting to boom with followers. Even if you are not a keen connoisseur of the train travel experience, a trip to the must visit locations in Turkey will not be completed without hopping on one. covering the legendary Paris Istanbul the comfort and convenience in these trains is a must opt for.

The best routes which are highly recommended would be Eastern Express, a train departing from the capital city Ankara with a 24 hours’ journey taking you across the diverse culture and many scenic locations. The list does not end here turkey also has Karabuk-Zonguldak, a train to the wild, which will take you through the lush forests, and if lucky enough, you can get a chance to see many rare wild animals.

Camp in the Kackar Mountains

Having an elevation of 3972 metres, a trip to the top of this mountain will be filled with many thrilling experiences. The best way to admire the beauty of this peaceful place is to plan a camping night here and enjoy it in serene surroundings for a while. Filled with numerous seasonal flora and fauna, this peak will let you enjoy the best of what nature has to offer.

Enjoy the view of the sun settling in the snow clad peaks and the dramatic precipices. A camp night here will surely be filled with some scenic adventures while enjoying a comfy settlement. Having numerous campsites, some of them even along the gushing waterfalls, a trip here will surely be adrenaline rushing.

Visit Silk Carpet Factory

Any person visiting Turkey should not miss out on experiencing the creation of silk and the carpets live. The experience of visiting a silk carpet factory is as lovely as the art piece itself. The journey starts with the process of how silk cocoons are formed and how silk is reeled from the cocoons to make silk threads.

This is followed by the explanation of carpet weaving, including the difference between wool and silk carpet weaving. The trip is then followed by how it is finally woven by some most exquisite women. Do not forget to take back a piece of turkey, the local handicraft of silk carpet. Adding some extra stars to the rich culture of Turkey, the quality silk available here cannot be bought from anywhere else.

Location : Istanbul.

Timing: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Soak in Thermal Pools at Pamukkale

Thermal pools are the natural formations made by minerals, which hold water and help it in staying warm. Those who are thinking of just having a relaxing experience and wish to ditch the hustle and bustle of all the unique things to do in turkey.

Head to the big white cotton castle. We assure you , the thermal pools at Pamukkale are an experience just like walking over a cotton castle with hot water gushing away all your stress. One of the best offbeat things to do in Turkey, a dip into these waters will surely let you enjoy a fun filled time while enjoying these natural springs.

Location: Kale, 20190 Pamukkale, Denizli Merkez, Denizli, Turkey.

Timing: 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM.

Take a Boat Trip on the Traditional Wooden Gullet

Offering something for our patrons with nautical indulgence, unusual things to do in Turkey is vast. The traditional wooden gullet is surely an unforgettable experience which would make you travel back to the gentler ages where one could sail over the clear turquoise heavens.

Originally built for the sailors to travel across the mediterranean sea, now these gullets are used as hotels, shops, stays and what not. Offering a list of packages, you can enjoy having fun here from sone hours to many days. Found in almost every watery part of Istanbul, these boats are filled with every basic equipment and offer a comfortable stay to the guests.

Best of

Avanos Hair museum

Did you know that Turkey is unique enough to have a hair museum all donated by the female visitors? Well we really feel that this place can be listed as a star in the list of offbeat things to do in Turkey as you would never hear a story same as the origin tale of Avanos hair museum.

It is said that a local potter was giving farewell to a dear friend when he asked for a memento using which he could remember her. Thus, she cut off a piece of her hair and gave it to the potter. The story made many people do so, thus the display got filled with so many bunches that in 1979, a whole museum was made for this.

Location: Yukar?, No: 24, 110. Sk., 50500 Avanos/Nev?ehir, Turkey.

Timing: 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM.

Best of


A trip for everyone

Traveling with a group of people is never easy, because everyone likes a different kind of vacation. Some travel to have the time of their life. Some travel for leisure, a break from the pressures of work or their personal lives. Some travel to experience new cultures and learn about the history of a place. And some travel to get a taste of everything. Filled with striking landscapes and with a rich cultural background, Antalya is the perfect destination for a compromise. The list of things to do in Antalya is endless it really is a destination for everyone.


Offbeat Things to Do in Turkey

Ballooning over Cappadocia

Enjoy the panoramic view of wide settled Turkey while soaring into the sky and enjoying a ride in a hot air balloon. Generally, there are many types of flights which one might choose from. From the deluxe rides to the standard, they offer many options to choose from.

For those looking for solace, they can opt for the deluce one and enjoy the picturesque view of turkey alone from high above. Those who want to have this experience without hurting their pockets, they can go for the standard one, in which they will be accompanied by 16 to 24 people. The duration of flights also haries, you can book a 90 minute or 2 hours flight, depending on your choice.

Featured

Visit the Underground Mosque in Istanbul

The unusual mosque has a storied history where it’s believed that back when the Galata neighborhood was a Genoese settlement, the site was a Byzantine fort. The basement of the fort supposedly helda huge chain that protected the Byzantine locals from Turkish attacks by blocking ships from entering into the city.

Thus if as a traveller, one wishes to indulge in a little bit of history and experience everything first hand and breathe in a little bit of the story this unique location should be a must visit on your trip. Since then, in 1757 the subterranean space was eventually converted into a mosque under the auspices of Grand Vizier Bahir Mustafa Pa?a.

Location: Kemanke? Karamustafa Pa?a, Kemanke? Cd. No:23, 34425 Beyo?lu/?stanbul, Turkey.

Timing: 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM.

Stay at the Gairasu Cave Hotel

The hotel is located in a restored thousand-year-old Byzantine retreat which offers modern conveniences without distracting from the spiritual feeling of the area which has been known to be inhabited for more than five thousand years. Gamirasu cave Hotel is featured in major international travel guides as one of the best cave hotels of Turkey.

It is a perfect destination if you wish to have a quiet cozy honeymoon or just want to take a dip into the tranquility of a simpler life away from the hectic life of the city. If you are looking for some unique things to do in turkey then this place ensures a once in a lifetime experience for anyone who visits.

Location: Ayval? Köyü ?ç Yolu, 50400 Ayval?/Ürgüp/Nev?ehir, Turkey.

Timing: Open 24*7.

Price: Varies for each booking.

Explore the Kekova Island

Only accessible by boats, Kekova island is an absolute beauty to behold. Believed to be the home to the ruins of Simena, a partially sunken city of Lycians, this place holds a storybook charm. Having many stories related to it, it is believed that this place has some of its part within the water, reaching where is not possible.

So we would definitely suggest this gem if you not only wish to add to your unique things to do in Turkey list but also to board over the journey of introspection. The tranquility of the waters and the history of the place will definitely give you an experience of stepping into a book but the lazy airs and the welcoming locals make the place rather perfect for a nice little picnic to be enjoyed with your loved ones.

Don’t miss the Traditional Turkish Bath

Once you are done enjoying what all Turkey has to offer or just want to head towards a break from it we would say head towards the nearest Hamam , a traditional Turkish bath. It would definitely wash off all your stress, worries, germs and exhaustion and what would remain would be the rejuvenated & beautiful you.

People from all over the world visit Turkey to try this once in a lifetime experience and enjoy a fun filled day with their families and friends. Your first hammam experience might be a daunting experience when it comes to the smell, heat etc but try giving it an honest chance and it might be a delightful experience to remember.

Watch Men Oil Wrestle

Oil wrestling is one of the oldest sports in Turkey, included in a historic festival that has been held annually since 1346. Also known as “grease wrestling”, this is the national sport of turkey. The wrestlers are coated in oil followed by an intense session of wrestling in the ring.

This roman tradition of wrestling is still being followed and practised in many corners of Turkey. The coating of oil has a strategic and not just prurient use as it makes the wrestlers slick and tough to get a hold of. Wouldn’t that be interesting to slip through your way trying to beat the opponent.

Location: The best place to experience this spectacular activity would be Karamulser, Samsun, Anatalya and Thrace region.

Go Skiing

From lazing around a hammock to spinning your favourite drink and from skiing in its pristine beaches to watching the sun setting above the horizon, Turkey offers a huge list of activities that can be done around its beaches. Skiing however remains the most adrenaline rushing activity one can experience here.

Enhance your skills while traversing these low as well as high waves and spend a day having fun in the blue waters of many places like Kartepe, Kartalkaya and many more. This water skiing experience will also let you admire the lush marine life as you traverse the waters along the shore.

Location: The country offers an array of destinations like Kartepe, Karatlkaya, Erciyes just to name a few.

Timing: 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Go on Biblical Pilgrimage

Being home to many holy christian sites, a trip to Turkey is often referred to as the biblical pilgrimage. The country is a home to many holy Christian sites like St.Nicholas' Birthplace, Antalya, St.Nicholas Church, Early Christian Settlement, Seven Churches of the Revelation (Ephesus, Pergamon, Smyrna, Laodicea, Sardis, Philadelphia, Thyatira) and Assyrian Orthodox Church of Virgin Mary.

Those who plan a holy visit to Turkey never miss any of these spiritual places. Apart from being a holy place, these locations are also known for their ancient architecture and psychic vibes.

Location: Most of the sites are in Istanbul, Konya, Usak and Antakya.

Timing: 10 AM to 6:00 PM(may vary for each location)

Enjoy the Train Rides

The Turkey train rides are exactly what you would require for a social media account waiting to boom with followers. Even if you are not a keen connoisseur of the train travel experience, a trip to the must visit locations in Turkey will not be completed without hopping on one. covering the legendary Paris Istanbul the comfort and convenience in these trains is a must opt for.

The best routes which are highly recommended would be Eastern Express, a train departing from the capital city Ankara with a 24 hours’ journey taking you across the diverse culture and many scenic locations. The list does not end here turkey also has Karabuk-Zonguldak, a train to the wild, which will take you through the lush forests, and if lucky enough, you can get a chance to see many rare wild animals.

Camp in the Kackar Mountains

Having an elevation of 3972 metres, a trip to the top of this mountain will be filled with many thrilling experiences. The best way to admire the beauty of this peaceful place is to plan a camping night here and enjoy it in serene surroundings for a while. Filled with numerous seasonal flora and fauna, this peak will let you enjoy the best of what nature has to offer.

Enjoy the view of the sun settling in the snow clad peaks and the dramatic precipices. A camp night here will surely be filled with some scenic adventures while enjoying a comfy settlement. Having numerous campsites, some of them even along the gushing waterfalls, a trip here will surely be adrenaline rushing.

Visit Silk Carpet Factory

Any person visiting Turkey should not miss out on experiencing the creation of silk and the carpets live. The experience of visiting a silk carpet factory is as lovely as the art piece itself. The journey starts with the process of how silk cocoons are formed and how silk is reeled from the cocoons to make silk threads.

This is followed by the explanation of carpet weaving, including the difference between wool and silk carpet weaving. The trip is then followed by how it is finally woven by some most exquisite women. Do not forget to take back a piece of turkey, the local handicraft of silk carpet. Adding some extra stars to the rich culture of Turkey, the quality silk available here cannot be bought from anywhere else.

Location : Istanbul.

Timing: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Soak in Thermal Pools at Pamukkale

Thermal pools are the natural formations made by minerals, which hold water and help it in staying warm. Those who are thinking of just having a relaxing experience and wish to ditch the hustle and bustle of all the unique things to do in turkey.

Head to the big white cotton castle. We assure you , the thermal pools at Pamukkale are an experience just like walking over a cotton castle with hot water gushing away all your stress. One of the best offbeat things to do in Turkey, a dip into these waters will surely let you enjoy a fun filled time while enjoying these natural springs.

Location: Kale, 20190 Pamukkale, Denizli Merkez, Denizli, Turkey.

Timing: 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM.

Take a Boat Trip on the Traditional Wooden Gullet

Offering something for our patrons with nautical indulgence, unusual things to do in Turkey is vast. The traditional wooden gullet is surely an unforgettable experience which would make you travel back to the gentler ages where one could sail over the clear turquoise heavens.

Originally built for the sailors to travel across the mediterranean sea, now these gullets are used as hotels, shops, stays and what not. Offering a list of packages, you can enjoy having fun here from sone hours to many days. Found in almost every watery part of Istanbul, these boats are filled with every basic equipment and offer a comfortable stay to the guests.

Best of

Avanos Hair museum

Did you know that Turkey is unique enough to have a hair museum all donated by the female visitors? Well we really feel that this place can be listed as a star in the list of offbeat things to do in Turkey as you would never hear a story same as the origin tale of Avanos hair museum.

It is said that a local potter was giving farewell to a dear friend when he asked for a memento using which he could remember her. Thus, she cut off a piece of her hair and gave it to the potter. The story made many people do so, thus the display got filled with so many bunches that in 1979, a whole museum was made for this.

Location: Yukar?, No: 24, 110. Sk., 50500 Avanos/Nev?ehir, Turkey.

Timing: 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM.

Best of


Troy (Truva)

So after having read some reviews of “there’s not much here” variety. what were those people looking at.

Troy is amazing! Literally layers upon layers of civilization. You can see the progress of history from one layer to the next. It goes beyond the myth into the real. Where else can you go and they say, “We haven’t bothered to excavate the Roman part of the city because those kinds of ruins are so common in Turkey”? Here, that’s where. I traveled all over Turkey and saw plenty of Roman and Greek ruins, but the ruins here go so much deeper - literally.

I was staying in Çanakkale and was able to join a day tour from Istanbul hosted by Crowded House Tours and Sukru was our guide. He was great and was able to communicate so much about the site in a fun and effective way. Plus he had a ton of fishing tips - free of charge!

If I had it to do over again, I’d spend a little more time and perhaps do more than the half day tour. So if the day trip from Istanbul is all you can manage, for sure do it. But if you’re staying close by as I was - spend more time in Troy. It’s worth it.


Contents

Antiquity Edit

The area of Antioch has been occupied by humans since the Calcolithic era (6th millennium BC), as revealed by archeological excavations of the mound of Tell-Açana, among others. [ citation needed ]

The King of Macedon Alexander the Great, after defeating the Persians in the Battle of Issus in 333 BC, followed the Orontes south into Syria and occupied the area. The city of Antioch was founded in 300 BC, after the death of Alexander, by the Hellenistic Seleucid King Seleucus I Nicator. [ citation needed ] It played an important role as one of the largest cities in the Hellenistic Seleucid Kingdom, in the Roman Empire, and in the Byzantine Empire. The city swapped hands between the Byzantines and the Persian Sassanids in the 3rd century and was the battleground for the siege of Antioch where Shapur I defeated the Roman army, and a later Battle of Antioch (613) where the Persians were successful at capturing the city for the last time. It was a key city during the early history of Christianity, in particular that of the Syriac Orthodox Church and the Antiochian Orthodox Church, as well as during the rise of Islam and the Crusades.

Rashidun period Edit

In 637, during the reign of the Byzantine emperor Heraclius, Antioch was conquered by the Rashidun Caliphate during the Battle of the Iron Bridge. The city became known in Arabic as أنطاكية (ʾAnṭākiya). Since the Umayyad dynasty was unable to penetrate the Anatolian plateau, Antioch found itself on the frontline of the conflicts between two hostile empires during the next 350 years, so that the city went into a precipitous decline.

In 969, the city was reconquered for the Byzantine Emperor Nikephoros II Phokas by Michael Bourtzes and the stratopedarches Peter. It soon became the seat of a dux, who commanded the forces of the local themes and was the most important officer on the Empire's eastern border, [ citation needed ] held by such men as Nikephoros Ouranos. In 1078, Philaretos Brachamios, an Armenian rebel, seized power. He held the city until the Seljuk Turks captured it from him in 1084. The Sultanate of Rum held it only fourteen years before the Crusaders arrived. [6]

Crusader era Edit

The Crusaders' Siege of Antioch between October 1097 and June 1098 during the First Crusade resulted in its fall. The Crusaders caused significant damage, including a massacre of its population, both Christian and Muslim. [7] Following the defeat of Seljuk forces arriving with the aim to break the siege only four days after its capture by the crusaders, Bohemond I became its overlord. [7] It remained the capital of the Latin Principality of Antioch for nearly two centuries.

In 1268 it fell to the Egyptian Mamluk Sultan Baibars after another siege. Baibars proceeded to massacre the Christian population. [8] In addition to suffering the ravages of war, the city lost its commercial importance because trade routes to East Asia moved north following the 13th-century Mongol conquests. Antioch never recovered as a major city, with much of its former role falling to the port city of Alexandretta (İskenderun). An account of both cities as they were in 1675 appears in the diary of the English naval chaplain Henry Teonge.

Ottoman city Edit

The city was initially the center of the Sanjak of Antakya, part of the Damascus Eyalet. It was laterly center of Sanjak of Antakya in Aleppo Eyalet. It was finally kaza center in Sanjak of Aleppo, part of Aleppo Vilayet.

In 1822 (and again in 1872), Antakya was hit by an earthquake and damaged. When Ottoman general Ibrahim Pasha established his headquarters in the city in 1835, it had only some 5,000 inhabitants. Supporters hoped the city might develop thanks to the Euphrates Valley Railway, which was supposed to link it to the port of Sueida (now Samandağı), but this plan never came to fruition. This scheme is the subject of Letitia Elizabeth Landon's poem Antioch. (1836) in which she reflects of the superiority of trade and commerce over war and conflict. The city suffered repeated outbreaks of cholera due to inadequate infrastructure for sanitation. [6] Later the city developed and rapidly resumed much of its old importance when a railway was built along the lower Orontes Valley.

French Mandate and Turkish annexation Edit

Antioch was part of the Sanjak of Alexandretta during the French Mandate of Syria and Lebanon, until it was made the Hatay State in 1938, after Turkish pressure. [9] An Arab nationalist newspaper in the city, run by Zaki al-Arsuzi, was shut down by the Turks. The annexation of the Hatay State by Turkey in 1939, creating the Hatay Province, caused an exodus of Christians and Alawites from Antioch east to the French Mandate.

In 1935, Turkish and Arab Muslims made more than 80% of population.

Census of 1935 [10] [11]
Ethnic group Population (percentage)
Sunni Muslims 19,720 (58%) [11]
Alawites 8,670 (25.5%) [11]
Christians 4,930 (14.5%) [11]
Others 680 (2%)
Total¹ 34,000 (100%) [11]

¹Most Alawis and Armenians spoke Turkish as a second language [10] and spoke either Arabic or Armenian as a first language.

A British traveller at Antakya in year 1798 said "the language here is generally Turkish" (while, by contrast the prevalent language at Aleppo at the time was Arabic). [12]

Mount Habib-i Neccar (Habib An-Najar in Sura al Yassin 36:13 ) and the city walls which climb the hillsides symbolise Antakya, making the city a formidable fortress built on a series of hills running north-east to south-west. Antakya was originally centred on the east bank of the river. Since the 19th century, the city has expanded with new neighbourhoods built on the plains across the river to the south-west, and four bridges connect the old and new cities. Many of the buildings of the last two decades are styled as concrete blocks, and Antakya has lost much of its classic beauty. [ citation needed ] The narrow streets of the old city can become clogged with traffic.

Although the port city Iskenderun has become the largest city in Hatay, Antakya is a provincial capital still of considerable importance as the centre of a large district. The draining of Lake Amik and development of land has caused the region's economy to grow in wealth and productivity. The town is a lively shopping and business centre with many restaurants, cinemas and other amenities. This district is centred on a large park opposite the governor's building and the central avenue Kurtuluş Caddesı. The tea gardens, cafes and restaurants in the neighbourhood of Harbiye are popular destinations, particularly for the variety of meze in the restaurants. The Orontes River can be malodorous when water is low in summer. Rather than formal nightlife, in the summer heat, people will stay outside until late in the night to walk with their families and friends, and munch on snacks.

Its location near the Syrian border makes Antakya more cosmopolitan than many cities in Turkey. It did not attract the mass immigration of people from eastern Anatolia in the 1980s and 1990s that radically swelled the populations of Mediterranean cities such as Adana and Mersin. Both Turkish and Arabic are still widely spoken in Antakya, although written Arabic is rarely used. A mixed community of faiths and denominations co-exist peacefully here. Although almost all the inhabitants are Muslim, a substantial proportion adhere to the Alevi and the Arab Alawi traditions, in 'Harbiye' there is a place to honour the saint Hızır. Numerous tombs of saints, of both Sunni and Alawite, are located throughout the city. Several small Christian communities are active in the city, with the largest church being St. Peter and St. Paul on Hurriyet Caddesi. With its long history of spiritual and religious movements, Antakya is a place of pilgrimage for Christians. The Jewish community of Antakya had shrunk to 14 members in 2014. [13] [14] It has a reputation in Turkey as a place for spells, fortune telling, miracles and spirits.

Local crafts include a soap scented with the oil of bay tree.

Antakya is located on the banks of the Orontes River (Turkish: Asi Nehri), approximately 22 km (14 mi) inland from the Mediterranean coast. The city is in a valley surrounded by mountains, the Nur Mountains (ancient Amanos) to the north and Mount Keldağ (Jebel Akra) to the south, with the 440 m high Mount Habib-i Neccar (the ancient Mount Silpius) forming its eastern limits. The mountains are a source of a green marble. Antakya is at the northern edge of the Dead Sea Rift and vulnerable to earthquakes.

The plain of Amik to the north-east of the city is fertile soil watered by the Orontes, the Karasu and the Afrin rivers the lake in the plain was drained in 1980 by a French company. At the same time channels were built to widen the Orontes and let it pass neatly through the city centre. The Orontes is joined in Antakya by the Hacı Kürüş stream to the north-east of the city near the church of St Peter, and the Hamşen which runs down from Habib-i Neccar to the south-west, under Memekli Bridge near the army barracks. Flora includes the bay trees and myrtle.

Climate Edit

The city enjoys a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification Csa) with hot and dry summers, and mild and wet winters however due to its higher altitude, Antakya has slightly cooler temperatures than the coast.

Climate data for Antakya
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 11
(51)
14
(57)
18
(64)
22
(71)
26
(78)
28
(82)
30
(86)
31
(87)
30
(86)
27
(80)
20
(68)
13
(55)
22
(71)
Average low °C (°F) 4
(39)
5
(41)
8
(46)
11
(51)
15
(59)
20
(68)
23
(73)
24
(75)
20
(68)
14
(57)
8
(46)
5
(41)
13
(55)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 190
(7.5)
170
(6.5)
140
(5.6)
110
(4.2)
81
(3.2)
33
(1.3)
7.6
(0.3)
5.1
(0.2)
28
(1.1)
89
(3.5)
110
(4.3)
190
(7.5)
1,150
(45.1)
Source: Weatherbase [15]

Mustafa Kemal University, abbreviated as MKU, has several faculties including Engineering and Medicine, while having a campus called Tayfur Sökmen located in Serinyol district 15 km (9.3 mi), north of Antakya (centrum). Established in 1992, currently more than 32,000 students enrolled at the university. [16]

Besides the campus in Serinyol, MKU has its faculties spread out in all main districts of the province including Altınözü, Antakya, Belen, Dörtyol, Erzin, Hassa, İskenderun, Kırıkhan, Reyhanlı, Samandağ and Yayladağı.


Watch the video: Ephesus, Turkey: Ancient City (August 2022).